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Quantum MIIM Diodes Beat Silicon
9/6/2013

MIIM devices have four layers, (left to right) amorphous zirconium, hafnium oxide, aluminum oxide and aluminum, shown here in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) image.
(Source: Oregon State University)
MIIM devices have four layers, (left to right) amorphous zirconium, hafnium oxide, aluminum oxide and aluminum, shown here in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) image.
(Source: Oregon State University)

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_hm
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Major Technology Achievement
_hm   9/6/2013 8:21:35 PM
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This is a major technological achievement. Hope they work more to make it apply to practical devices. It will interesting to know quantitative comparision - gain in speed, saving in power, voltage level required to operate it.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Major Technology Achievement
R_Colin_Johnson   9/6/2013 9:07:32 PM
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Their next step is optimization, before they try to build a transistor. You can get more details about specs etcs. in the Applied Physics Letters paper :(but its NOT free):

http://apl.aip.org/resource/1/applab/v102/i14/p143501_s1

rick merritt
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Re: Major Technology Achievement
rick merritt   9/6/2013 9:47:34 PM
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We need CMOS alternatives. Keep cranking guys!

goafrit
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Re: Major Technology Achievement
goafrit   9/8/2013 5:57:21 AM
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Is this about CMOS or the material? I think we can still have CMOS design paradigm with another material beside Silicon. I hope we crack this code soon as it is long overdue. Something needs to help provide a new path for the continuation of Moore's law

Kinnar
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Re: Major Technology Achievement
Kinnar   9/8/2013 5:59:59 AM
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Yes quite true, the industries are desperately looking for the CMOS alternative that can work beyond Gigahertz, since this metal alternatives have got bandwidth ranging upto Terahertz, if this time the technology gets commercially accepted it will really open a new era.

Phononscattering
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What does it do?
Phononscattering   9/7/2013 2:12:54 AM
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Ok, so i'll be the first one to bite. What does this device actually do?

To me, it looks like a two terminal tunneling device with electrodes at two different work functions. The difference in work function means that the I/V behavior will be asymmetric, so it could show a weak diode like behavior, but probably still a lot different to what we are used to from semiconductor diodes.

Since there is no semiconductor involved, switching delays caused by minority carrier recombination (diffusion capacitance) should be absent. That is probabably the reason for the claim for speed. However there could be a disadvantage due to the extremely high capacitance of the MIM structure.

There are some other drawbacks too: The way quantum tunneling behaves in such a two layer devices means that there are some second order slope changes in the I/V behavior. The material used (Al2O3 and HfO2) are also prone to electron trapping. This means that there are most likely additional conduction mechanisms, which will give rise to device leakage at low bias, dielectric relaxation (1/t decaying current after switch) and noise.

So here are my questions:
  1. What is the exact application of this device?
  2. What are the relevant figures of merit that are optimized in respect to semiconductor diodes? How does it compare in the other ones?
  3. How is this supposed to "beat CMOS" or lead to transistors? My understanding so far is, that this is a two- not three terminal device. So it can not replace a transistor.


resistion
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Re: What does it do?
resistion   9/7/2013 3:25:01 AM
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Yes as two terminal, a larger voltage is needed to drive a current compared to a transistor, which uses a third terminal to modulate current.

Phononscattering
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Re: What does it do?
Phononscattering   9/7/2013 4:33:09 AM
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Ok, after some web searching I found comprehensive information. Seems like the technology itself is not new and has already performed well in the past, but failed commercially due to lack of differentiating applications.


Too bad the article mentions none of this

 

http://ecee.colorado.edu/~moddel/QEL/MIIM_Overview.pdf

http://ecee.colorado.edu/~moddel/QEL/Phiar.html

http://ecee.colorado.edu/~moddel/QEL/Papers/Rockwell08.pdf

 

 

 

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: What does it do?
R_Colin_Johnson   9/7/2013 7:14:12 AM
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Thanks for the context and references. Yes, these metal-insulator structures seem to be one of those eternally "almost here" technologies that researchers just keep plugging away at.

 

resistion
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Re: What does it do?
resistion   9/7/2013 2:14:29 PM
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http://ecee.colorado.edu/~moddel/QEL/Papers/Rockwell08.pdf

 

the diode is hardly nonlinear enough.

Ron Neale
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Re: What does it do? Light or uW as third terminal
Ron Neale   9/7/2013 3:55:06 PM
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Phononscattering "How is this supposed to "beat CMOS" or lead to transistors? My understanding so far is, that this is a two- not three terminal device. So it can not replace a transistor."

For a two terminal device structure, think of light or microwave input as the third terminal. Where the device is mounted in a lightwaveguide or a microwave guide. As we push frequencies higher those two will tend to merge. Quantum  coupling efficiency will be the equivalent of gain.

The reliability of MIMs has been a problem in the past and limited widespread use. Given reliability they may find application in optical detectors in high speed backplanes. Who knows when TSVs run out of signal carrying capacity optical detection MIMs might allow TSV to be just holes!!

 

 

Yog-Sothoth
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Sounds a bit like a tunnel diode
Yog-Sothoth   9/8/2013 4:14:10 AM
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Tunnel diodes were in the 60's the solution looking for a problem. But being two terminal they never caught on. Input/output isolation of two terminal devices is always going to be a problem.

 

 

Phononscattering
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Re: Sounds a bit like a tunnel diode
Phononscattering   9/9/2013 3:33:34 AM
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It definitely IS a tunnel diode. But not a semiconductor but a metal electrode one. The difference is, that the semiconductor tunnel diode of the 60ies shows a region of negative differential resistance which allows some interesting applications as oscillator nd so on. The MIM diode can not show this kind of behavior due to the different band structure of the electrodes.

My current understanding of the MIIM diode is, that its main application is as a demodulator/detecter for very high freqiencies.

resistion
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missing point about tunneling
resistion   9/8/2013 6:13:33 AM
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A tunneling-based device may be ideally designed or optimized for high nonlinearity. But it should be recognized that tunneling is not expected to be a high current output mechanism matching CMOS. A MOSFET that is off is already a tunneling barrier (reverse bias pn junction depletion zone) with nonlinearity.

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