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TI Launches Purpose-Built SoCs for Automotive Vision

10/16/2013 00:01 AM EDT
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junko.yoshida
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ease of programming
junko.yoshida   10/16/2013 12:14:39 PM
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TI's new SoC is packed with everything you probable wanted in your next ADAS SoC. The question now is how easy for you to use this one!

Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: ease of programming
Sheetal.Pandey   10/16/2013 2:15:23 PM
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TI has very good development support in terms of availabilitg of free technical documentation. Their engineers are also very cooperative so time to design remains in schedule.

rick merritt
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Cool
rick merritt   10/16/2013 5:44:13 PM
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These SoCs suggest smart people think this is getting very real

junko.yoshida
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Re: Cool
junko.yoshida   10/17/2013 6:58:38 PM
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That's certainly true, Rick. I was just at ITS World Congress in Tokyo. It was clear that every carmaker is in need of "purpose built" SoCs for autoomtive vision that sees and analyze the situation faster and better. (and at low power!) 

daleste
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Re: Cool
daleste   10/17/2013 8:41:09 PM
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This technology will get big fast.  Since TI does manufacture chips for auotomotive, they have a leg up on the qualification requirements.  Not all semiconductor companies can meet the automotive requirements.

Bert22306
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Ties in nicely with the "freaking out" article
Bert22306   10/17/2013 9:15:14 PM
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"Further, 93 percent of traffic accidents in the United States are estimated to be due to human error."

I would have thought that number to be closer to 100 percent. I wonder, for example, if that stat includes less than ideal response to a sudden contingency, where a more expert, or perhaps automated reponse, could have avoided an accident. Things like skidding on ice, sudden tire failure, that sort of thing, where the blame is usually put on the mechanical problem rather than the response.

Very timely article. And if these vision systems are going to be a major component of the V2I solution, scanning signs and so on, there's going to be even more demand on the algorithms. Pretty exciting stuff, I'd say.

rstjobs
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Re: ease of programming
rstjobs   10/17/2013 10:29:57 PM
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As vision algorithms need lot of computational power, as hardware getting smarter faster we will see lot of such smart applications in future

junko.yoshida
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Re: Cool
junko.yoshida   10/18/2013 1:09:57 AM
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@daleste, that's a good point. I know that qualification is really a huge deal in the automotive market. Does TI manufacture pretty much all the automotive chips, then?

junko.yoshida
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Re: Ties in nicely with the "freaking out" article
junko.yoshida   10/18/2013 1:19:41 AM
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No doubt, this is a hot field that's growing fast, I think.

Until several years ago, a lot of machine vision stuff was done on a sheer compute power basis. Purpose-built ADAS SoCs by comanies like Cognive, TI, Freescale and ST will definitely change the landscape for automotive vision.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Ties in nicely with the "freaking out" article
junko.yoshida   10/18/2013 1:33:51 AM
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What causes the remaining seven percent of traffic accidents  is an interesting question I haven't given much thought about. I will find out the answer...

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