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DDR4 You Can Use Now

10/17/2013 10:30 AM EDT
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rick merritt
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Timely
rick merritt   10/18/2013 4:24:00 AM
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Interestingly some now say the DDR road map is not keeping pace and something new is needed. We will see stacked memory interfaces like HMC and WideIO come into production in the next year r so. Watch this space.

gmtrmt
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Re: Timely
gmtrmt   10/25/2013 7:25:24 AM
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...now that would be exciting to see!

_hm
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Price and availability
_hm   10/18/2013 7:13:06 PM
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This is a very good educative post. I would also like to know price comparision and availability for these devices in quantity. At what point of time, DDR4 will be more prevalent?

 

 

tb100
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Re: Price and availability
tb100   10/21/2013 12:36:17 PM
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At what point of time, DDR4 will be more prevalent?

I remember back when people were asking that question about DDR3 memory. Now DDR2 is a distant memory.

DDR4 will be more prevalent when CPUs that support DDR4 become more prevalent. Can a consumer even buy a PC (at Newegg, for example) that supports DDR4? I don't think AMD has any DDR4 CPUs yet. So, except for some servers, the cart is ahead of the horse.

DDR4 will be more prevalent when you can buy a PC at Newegg or Costco that supports it. And then you will see the rapid demise of DDR3.

 

And, like DDR3 when it first came out, at first DDR4 is much more expensive. When you can buy PCs that take DDR4, manufacturers will switch their production from DDR3 to DDR4 (Samsung has already started). Then DDR4 will be faster, lower power, and cheaper. This is why you'll see DDR3 disappear faster than you can blink.

_hm
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Re: Price and availability
_hm   10/21/2013 5:51:42 PM
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@tb100: Thanks for your reply. Do anyone has ballpark time line for this? Will the design with DDR4 be simpler?

 

Kinnar
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Double the frequency of operation
Kinnar   10/21/2013 6:58:05 AM
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DDR4 is capable of providing more the double frequency of operation as compared to DDR3 in use today. But the acceptance of the DDR4 production was very much slow, still it depends how much affordable it becomes to the consumers.

Sanjib.A
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Re: Double the frequency of operation
Sanjib.A   10/21/2013 1:36:53 PM
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I guess I saw it was mentioned somewhere that DDR4 memories will have lot less power consumption compared to the DDR3 memories even though the frequency of operation is much higher compared to DDR3...how is that possible? Because of lower operating voltage?

Once DDR4 sales pick up, would DDR2/3 chips be made obsolete or those will co-exists? 

 

tb100
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Re: Double the frequency of operation
tb100   10/22/2013 2:46:15 PM
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I don't think DDR3/DDR2 will stop being manufactured, just that the manufacturers willl switch a larger portion of their factories to DDR4, just as what happened with the DDR2->DDR3 transition.

It makes sense for servers that want speed, and it also makes sense for phones and tablets that want power savings. 

Now that 64 bit CPUs are starting to show up in phones and tablets, they can start putting more than 3Gig of DRAM in them. But this extra memory eats up power. A lower power and higher density DDR4 seems to fit the problem nicely.

The memory manufacturers could sell their slower parts to these markets for a lower price.

Sanjib.A
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Re: Double the frequency of operation
Sanjib.A   10/23/2013 1:17:46 PM
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True...as you have mentioned, there are many applications where the power requirement is restricted and speed comes much below the low power requirement on the priority list; Where even SDRAMs could be preferred over DDR2/3.

I too guess that the memory manufacturing companies are not going to discontinue DDR2/3 soon, but due to lower volume, these chips might not get continued beyond 2015-16 time frame? Industrial systems ideally need to have a much longer service life compared to the phone, PCs; Hence I was thinking that the fast pace in the memory evolution is a challenge for the industrial product designers. What do you think? 

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