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Brain Implants Near Milestone
10/16/2013

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Archer shows a prototype RNS implant in a skull.
Archer shows a prototype RNS implant in a skull.

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MS243
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Hacking devices
MS243   10/18/2013 11:50:22 AM
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Often medical devices use very limited processors and the design studies to not analize the effects of hacking fully -- For example most of the ARM 7 CPU's so common in WiFi and Bluetooth have No MMU making the code that runs on them very vulnerable to hacking -- and little thought or effort is put into this and other hardware based security features that greatly expand the design scope of the projects, as well as expand the hardware and software effort required to prevent issues like this.  What is really needed is a clean slate approach to the next generation of wireless device hardware chipsets that make security first and foremost -- in my mind the security for a medical device should be made unbreakable to protect the life of the patient, as well as the lives of others -- a neural implant that is hacked could be used to trigger violence in an un-suspecting patient for example -- or could be used to condition the patient so their will power is reduced to criminal or other undesireable behavior.

DrFPGA
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Re: Terminal Man
DrFPGA   10/18/2013 10:47:33 AM
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Yep, sure do. Maybe thats why just thinking about this application makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up.

Anyone remember the episode of Homeland where the pacemaker was hacked to cause a heart attack? Just think what a neural implat could do if hacked... Ick...

Now I know it's just me, and this technology will eventually help lots of people (maybe even me), but it will take me a while to get used to the idea...

MS243
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It seems to me as though a more advanced packaging approach is needed
MS243   10/18/2013 10:22:58 AM
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It seems to me as though a more advanced packaging approach is  needed.  Still the technology for the use of reducing and controlling the effects of sizures holds great promise for helping the many Veteran's wounded in Afghanistan by IED's.  (Are the rare earth metals there used for electric cars really worth this human cost, or is there a better means of solving the vehicluar power issues -- such as converting air and water into fuel as is being done on a pilot basis in the UK?)

rick merritt
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Re: Sensing and algorithm development
rick merritt   10/18/2013 4:21:16 AM
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@Bert and Junko: Agreed. I believe the next big phase of computing beyond mobile is this so-called ubiquitous compouting of an instrumented smart world. But this is not my original tho0ught Mark Weiser of Xerox PARC popularized it in the 1980s.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Sensing and algorithm development
junko.yoshida   10/18/2013 1:30:40 AM
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Yes, Bert, I agree. I have a feeling that stories we will be writing about in the next 10 years are exactly on that battle; how best we can build a system (sensing and control, as you put it) that can take the man out of the loop...



I said "battle," because it wiill be no cake walk, technically speaking; but more importantly, I think this wiill challege our legal, economic and societal conventions and assumptions.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Sensing and algorithm development
junko.yoshida   10/18/2013 1:29:41 AM
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Yes, Bert, I agree. I have a feeling that stories we will be writing about in the next 10 years are exactly on that battle; how best we can build a system (sensing and control, as you put it) that can take the man out of the loop...



I said "battle," because it wiill be no cake walk, technically speaking; but more importantly, I think this wiill challege our legal, economic and societal conventions and assumptions.

Bert22306
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Re: Sensing and algorithm development
Bert22306   10/17/2013 8:47:50 PM
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You're right, Junko. Reason being, a lot of the most interesting stories have to do with control systems. Sensing what the system is doing is key to controlling that system. So when you take the "man out of the loop," sorry, I meant "person," you have to use automatic sensing.

junko.yoshida
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Sensing and algorithm development
junko.yoshida   10/17/2013 7:31:49 PM
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I almost feel like every story we write these days is about "sensing" and how best a certain chip can run the newest and greatest algorithm, and analyze senses!

krisi
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Re: Touching a nerve
krisi   10/17/2013 5:47:40 PM
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there is nothing wrong with using 0.5um or 0.35um transistors...many medical devices use them...and how would you get 10uW otherwise???

rick merritt
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Re: amazing
rick merritt   10/17/2013 5:13:17 PM
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@Krisi: Yes, and if Mir Imran's comments are accurate the market size may be even smaller than they anticipated.

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