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Jose Fernandez
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Re: Hacking devices
Jose Fernandez   10/28/2013 1:45:23 AM
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Interesting blog, I had to go back to neuropace webpage to see what kind of seizures they are targeting. Petit mal and grand mal, are not current used medical terms for seizures, the classification we use now are partial, generalized and unclassified. The target of these devices are Disabling motor simple partial seizures, complex partial seizures, and/or secondarily generalized seizures that are not controlled with the current medication.

I this will be something interesting specially for pediatric patients that have neurological syndromes that include these type of seizures and controlling that, could lead to a more healthy/regular style of life. Assuming this is only for adult patients, I am waiting to see what it will offer for the little ones.

rick merritt
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Re: Hacking devices
rick merritt   10/21/2013 12:28:46 PM
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@Selinz: Wow, I haven't witnessed a grand mal but can imagine the kind of human suffering these folks are trying to alliviate.

As Mir Imran suggests in the article the gap left over from what drugs serve may not be as wide as the startup would have hoped. I'd love to hear anyone weigh in with some numbers.

selinz
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Re: Hacking devices
selinz   10/20/2013 11:35:40 PM
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Having recentlhy witnessed a grand mal seizure from someone close, I'm happy to see this. At the same time, I think the extended approval period isworthwhile. From what I understand, the current state of anti-seizure drugs are very effective. I'd be curious to know under what circumstances the implants are more or less effective than the state of the art drugs... both are invasive but in different ways.

rick merritt
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Re: Hacking devices
rick merritt   10/20/2013 8:48:02 PM
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Yeah, there is always a hack and a countermeasure and a hack of the countermeasure and so on

Charles.Desassure
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Great news...
Charles.Desassure   10/20/2013 1:57:00 PM
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This is exciting news after 14 years of hard work.  The first implant to listen to brain waves and autonomously decide when to apply a therapy to prevent an epileptic seizure will indeed improve the life of many people.  I cannot wait to hear more.  Hope there will be a follow-up article with more detail information once it hit the market.

MS243
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Hacking devices
MS243   10/19/2013 11:41:34 AM
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If I understand Nearfield comunications and inductive loop communications they limit the potential range of the medical link to a safer distance -- now these type links need to be bullet proofed vs in-channel over an assumed good link, type attack --  probably harder and more expensive than meets the eye but this may be the best option.

prabhakar_deosthali
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re:
prabhakar_deosthali   10/19/2013 2:17:17 AM
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Evrything developed today has the hackers threat looming large on it. So why not make such devices stand alone with a physical key access.

Hackers need some connection, some port thorugh which to gain access to a system. But if you make a system such as this implant a stand aone thing then it could remain secure from the hackers and only accessible to the attending doctor or the patient himself.

MS243
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Re: Hacking devices
MS243   10/18/2013 7:43:38 PM
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I would venture a guess it could be done with just two electrodes and they would not even have to be within the skull.

rick merritt
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Author
Re: Hacking devices
rick merritt   10/18/2013 6:58:26 PM
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A hacker will have to be pretty sophisticated to figure out how to trigger specific behviors with eight max leads, a few low volt signals in a specific area of the brain!

goafrit
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Re: Touching a nerve
goafrit   10/18/2013 3:45:34 PM
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>> The way the device is fit into the skull a bit scary to me, so I believe in future devices will be more compact, thin and light weight

You are correct. I hope the era of nano-electronics will come when some of these advances can be implemented in a more robust way. Footprint is a key factor in this type of product. Very commendable feat and hope they can nail this with FDA approval to help people around the world

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