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Oracle Laser Lights Way to Silicon Photonics

10/22/2013 07:55 PM EDT
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rick merritt
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Optical C2C
rick merritt   10/23/2013 12:12:10 AM
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I've been earing about optical chip and board links for 20 years, but the depth and breadth of work today makes me believe it could be just 3-5 years away.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Optical C2C
junko.yoshida   10/23/2013 2:37:06 AM
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I know...you've writing about this for along time. Is Oracle the most advanced among those in the field?

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Optical C2C
R_Colin_Johnson   10/23/2013 9:53:54 AM
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Great report on Oracle's progress in silicon photonics. Intel claims to be ahead of the pack, and has the systems to prove it, but as noted in Rick's story its still early in the game and Oracle has the advantage of its big installed base hungry for the affordable increased bandwidth.

rick merritt
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Re: Optical C2C
rick merritt   10/23/2013 7:14:21 PM
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Intel has been talking about its good research for a decade. Krishnamoorthy said Oracle/Sun has been working as long but saying less. Rather than in house, Oracle is doing more with partners--startups Kotura and Luxtera among them. The sense is everyone is at about the same stage of readiness for a ~2017 market.

prabhakar_deosthali
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Re:
prabhakar_deosthali   10/23/2013 12:18:11 PM
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As a layman, I am curious to know how this silicon photonics differnet from the fibre optics. Is it the better speed, lower power or something else?

Terry.Bollinger
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Re: What is the main benefit of silicon photonics?
Terry.Bollinger   10/23/2013 1:46:57 PM
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What is the main distinction of photonics versus, say, using light in fiber communications?

Connectivity! Cheap, fast, powerful, and energetically low-cost flows of humongous numbers of bits between chips.

Imaging a gigantic server farm with only a couple of traditional analog phone lines running into it. You have enormous power, but no way to give it the data it needs to use that power, and no way to get the result back out.

Sadly, that's pretty much the situation for most modern chips: They are IO strangled, forced to live with data rates in and out that are far less than what they could handle if given the chance. It's like having a cheetah for a pet and keeping it in a room that only measures 5 meters by 5 meters.

The reason for this lies deep into physics: We use electrons to communicate with chips, and electrons are fermions, which just means they get very ornery about being pushed too close together. So to use them, you have to create separate paths for them, and also keep them separated in time. It's like herding cats: It only works if you define very clear paths that even an ornery cat has to stick to get anywhere.

Photons in contrast are bosons, which just means they have zero problems with stepping all over each other. So for example, in a cross-connect, photons can pass right through each, and do it in huge quantities, without any problem. You can see the same effect when you cross the beams of two lasers or flashlights without any problem (well, unless you are in a Ghost Busters movie). For contrast, try crossing the fermion-based water "beams" coming out of two garden hoses and watch the splatterific results. Ditto for electrons that are not kept carefully guided at all times.

Finally, photons can cross empty space, and have no annoying charges that must be cancelled out within a circuit. That makes them closest thing available to pure transfers of information.

Put all of that together, and what it means is that photonic lattices can unleash the real power of all those little chips, the ones that are pacing their silicon cages in abject frustration. Everything starts to move a lot faster, and does so using far less energy.

The two slides on Page 4 of the article nicely show the cost implications of letting all those little silicon cheetahs run free on a photonic lattice: A 6.5 times reduction in power costs, not bad! I suspect there would also be a huge reduction in the footprint for a given level of capabilities, so we are talking about *major* expansion of money-generating capacities for legacy data centers that are stuck with fixed power and cooling capacities.

So, as someone else noted here, it's great to see the old idea of photonic interconnects reaching a point where real commercial systems may be just a few years away. Success with photonic interconnects would obsolete traditional data center architectures and eventually take them over.

Whether Oracle will succeed in being the one to dominate this incipient market is yet to be seen, but clearly they are doing some great work. But my strong suspicion is that other groups are also doing great work, and some of them may not want to advertise what they are doing quite yet. That's because the market potential for this market so high for whoever gets it right first: Reinventing and re-equipping legacy and new data centers globally? Uh... wow? (A caveat: The second-starter-wins rule may apply here. Surprisingly often in IT, the first big player makes all the mistakes, while the second big player starts clean and ends up outpacing the founder.)

alche
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Re: What is the main benefit of silicon photonics?
alche   10/23/2013 3:44:19 PM
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Good post. All comes down to Bose-Einstein vs Fermi-Diraq statistics. Ironically, what makes photons so good for carrying information over distance makes them so bad for processing information due to the lack of interaction. We will still need electrons for a while longer ):

prabhakar_deosthali
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Re: What is the main benefit of silicon photonics?
prabhakar_deosthali   10/24/2013 4:03:29 AM
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@Terry.Bollinger

Thanks for this great information. I am truly enlightened now on this topic.

In the early days of microprocessors , the processor speed used to be a limitation to handle the real time situations so much so that we had to count those CPU cycles while writing the I/O handling interrupts. Now it seems the other way round .


rick merritt
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Re: What is the main benefit of silicon photonics?
rick merritt   10/24/2013 10:01:43 AM
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@Prabhakar: Yes, the Oracle presnetation did a great job putting into context expected advances in CPUs and memory that would leave interconnect as the next bottleneck in the near future and silicon photonics as the best route to busting thru it.

krisi
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Re: What is the main benefit of silicon photonics?
krisi   10/24/2013 12:10:33 PM
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This is not as simple as it sounds...you can't put silicon photonics transceiver for every IO signal...you can (maybe) do it in few selected places...but again where is teh source of the optical clock coming from??? I doubt that 2017 will see commercial deployment, the technology is not ready yet...Kris

krisi
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laser?
krisi   10/23/2013 5:05:16 PM
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The key technical probolem for years have been building a laser on silicon die...without it it is hard to talk about silicon photonics...by the sound of teh article this key problem has not been solved yet

alche
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Re: laser?
alche   10/23/2013 6:21:37 PM
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One alternative to Si photonics is plastic waveguide. Curiousely no one seems to talk about it.

krisi
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Re: laser?
krisi   10/23/2013 6:55:54 PM
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but plastic waveguide gives you only a media transport option...no integration with electronics on silicon chip

alche
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Re: laser?
alche   10/24/2013 11:37:21 AM
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 Most of the plastic waveguide components are easily integratable i.e. receivers/transmitters, etc. Indeed that's the attraction. Couplers can reside in the waveguide itself or the connector or the circuit board. Of course complete integration may not be possible - at least for some time, but same with Si photonics.

microdisk
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Re: laser?
microdisk   11/7/2013 1:30:35 AM
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it is ture, lasers cost are 10 times of silicon photonic chips. evanscent coupling based laser has been demonstrated and they claimed that the cost is much lower than other laser vendor, but the overall power cost still high (Ith is high). Fujitsu is using butt coupling for laser, but the packaging cost may high, the best way is to have a good grating coupler to couple the light into silicon photonic chip vertcially. 

krisi
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Re: laser?
krisi   11/7/2013 5:54:45 PM
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exactly...even is laser is cheap (and it is not) you still need to the packaging, laser alignment with silicon chip...not an easy thing to automate

microdisk
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Re: laser?
microdisk   11/11/2013 11:29:37 AM
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It should be no problem to form fiber to waveguide automation alignment as long as you can have a good spot size converter to expand the mode to match to the single mode fiber. 1um automation alignment accuracy should be ok to achieve.

krisi
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Re: laser?
krisi   11/11/2013 11:35:39 AM
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thanx @microdisk...any idea how much alignment operation within 1um would cost in volume?

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