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Mentor to Bring Virtualization to Automotive Designers

10/24/2013 11:30 AM EDT
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prabhakar_deosthali
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Whay not all-in-one system?
prabhakar_deosthali   10/24/2013 1:04:09 PM
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So may microprocessors, so many interconnects, so much multiplicity of operating systems - just to drive a car!

Why can't somebody put a kind of just a single mini-server to do all those jobs without creating this jungle of processors , their memories , their peripherals and the mesh of  CAn , LIN, TCP/Ip and all that.

A robust single processor system should be able to minimize this whole mess to a reliable real time embedded system handling Engine control, Navigation, multimedia, ABS, Parking assistance and whatever you can name .

 

Just  a wild thought!

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Whay not all-in-one system?
Caleb Kraft   10/24/2013 1:09:01 PM
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I've been told that they've been avoiding a single and central system to avoid having a single point of failure. I don't know how much weight I put in this, but I guess it makes sense.

LarryM99
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Re: Whay not all-in-one system?
LarryM99   10/24/2013 1:18:15 PM
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It is very tempting to think that, but the reality is that cars are becoming complex interconnected systems. The mode of operations has for many years been brute-force implementation of individual subsystems with minimal coupling between them. Implementing a hundred of these separate subsystems at, say, $10 each adds $1,000 to the BOM for a car. Replace that with a higher-capability shared subsystem that does all of it for, say $100, is a clear win.

It can also be a win technically. In individual subsystems any interaction between subsystems requires foreplanning and direct connectivity. With centralized resources interconnectivity becomes a software decision that can be made differently in later releases, without hardware changes. Think of it as a mobile SDN.

rick merritt
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Its about time
rick merritt   10/24/2013 2:05:59 PM
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Virtualization of processors, storage and now networking has been one of the biggest trends in computing and comms fr the last several years.

Embedded has been playing catch up. Intel pushed some of its tech this way a year or so ago. I believe other embedded OS vendors have too, but its still early days in the sector.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Whay not all-in-one system?
junko.yoshida   10/24/2013 9:51:10 PM
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Nicely explained, Larry. Thank you.

Integration ois different a clear trend among subsystem vendors, even though not exactly a single "all-in-one" system mentioned by prabhakar_deosthali.

allazar
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Re: Whay not all-in-one system?
allazar   10/25/2013 3:36:44 AM
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Then the PSU unit of that single, central mini-server smokes and poof, everything from ABS to window controls stops working. That's really not nice.

What automotive designers have now is a mess, but it's a redundant mess.

prabhakar_deosthali
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re:
prabhakar_deosthali   10/25/2013 8:35:14 AM
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@Allazar

Oh! come-on!

We are not that poor on the PSU's or the mini-servers design!

yes ! Some redundancy in design is called for but not some 100 odd micro-processors /micro-controllers doing small odd jobs!

chanj0
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Pros and Cons of 1 powerful MCU
chanj0   10/25/2013 2:02:07 PM
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Clearly, 1 processor does all is a very attractive proposition. With careful design and architect, the virtual machine will heal itself. 1 VM is crashing; another will be spawned and take over. In the world cloud computing, it isn't just a vision; it is a reality. What if this vision is applied to mcu to help running a vehicle?

People outside of the electronic and automotive industry properly doesn't realize there are so many MCU in any vehicles today. They cover injection control, transmission control, etc. With the advance of technology and market demand, infortainment, in-vehicle broadband, GPS tracking and light control are some of the new features. There are 10 of different kind of MCUs in the vehicle. Due to the installation location, they may have different requirement; definitely, they are sold with different price.  On one hand, MCUs for injection control and transmission control, which are considered as mission critical, may be installed closer to the front potion of the vehicle. They require a better heat disspation and sustainility. They must last. They will likely cost more because they are fabricated with 10+ years of reliability. On the other hands, MCU for infotainment is likely installed inside a better weather/ dirt control environment. If it doesn't last, nobody will get hurt. As a matter of fact, the infotainment system can just be your mobile device with different form factor.

Applying virtualization of MCU used for automotive certainly makes a lot of sense. With time and resources, I am sure the vision of self-recovery and high availability using VM will become reality. The challenges remain on how the overall system is being architected and, how many MCUs will be used and which area of control shall be combined to 1 MCU.

nicu_p
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What about latency?
nicu_p   10/25/2013 2:43:01 PM
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Most systems in a car (except for infotainment) are driven by hard latecy requirements, and today are runing into a bare metal (or very close) environment. I guess you would not want your VM handling, say, the braking system to be respawned, would you? Consolidation will happen in the infotainment/instruments cluster subsystems. For the rest, I'm curious to see who dares to move to a virtualized environment.

_hm
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Do-178B certification?
_hm   10/25/2013 7:59:00 PM
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Will this processor needs DO-178 certificatio or similar? The certification of processor and other software may be useful to lower cost for development in automobiule industry.

 

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