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IBM Wins Gordon Bell Prize

The power of tiny bubbles
11/25/2013 08:05 PM EST
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Kinnar
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Very good use of technology for solving real life problems
Kinnar   11/26/2013 5:42:43 AM
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This is a very good use of super computer for solving the real life problem both in engineering and medical field.

Yes two medical applications are listed in the article, but there will be possibilities of many other applications, it can be used to blockage in heart, will have great use in curing eye dieses as well.

 

IBMLabs
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IBM and ETH
IBMLabs   11/26/2013 10:07:44 AM
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ETH Zurich is a renown Swiss university - home to 21 Nobel Laureates and is not a part of IBM Research, but obviously an important partner.

Sanjib.A
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Supercomputer as the virtual laboratory
Sanjib.A   11/26/2013 1:05:28 PM
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"Supercomputer simulations could act as a virtual laboratory..." - really a great idea to exploit the potentials of the super computer efficiently to simulate real-life problems & solutions, resulting in success without number of real life clinical trials. Wish the team good luck and hope to see a success in fighting cancer using bubles soon!  

y_sasaki
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Power of bubbles
y_sasaki   11/26/2013 2:58:29 PM
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Bubbles in cooling fluid eat up your engine from inside out, because nano-scale shockwave is generated when tiny bubble collapses, tipping engine wall. This is called Cavitation Pitting. Car companies use computer simulation to design engine for minimizing bubbles. It is interesting to know that they use opposite way - maximize the power of bubbles to fight cancer. Very good way for utilizing technology, indeed.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Power of bubbles
junko.yoshida   11/28/2013 12:22:48 AM
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So, the story says:

"Now that allows us to do these simulations efficiently, we would like to extend to engineering problems that are similar to this one, since the area of fluid dynamics is much wider than bubble simulation,"

I would definitely like to know more about what "engineering" applications this might have. Yes, @y_sasaki, your example among carmakers is a good one.

Anybody has any other "engineering" problems that you think can be solved by this?

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