Breaking News
News & Analysis

CES 2014 to Spark Android vs. iOS In-Car Battle

Google to announce industry consortium connecting phones with cars
12/18/2013 07:40 AM EST
25 comments
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Page 1 / 2 Next >
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 3
Doug_S
User Rank
CEO
Re: the android advantage
Doug_S   12/18/2013 2:08:06 PM
NO RATINGS
The argument goes both ways.  Being able to customize Android means that it might have very different looks and versions between automakers, which would complicate things for app developers.

 

I don't think cars should integrate closely enough with either that it particularly matters which you use.  Cars last a lot longer than phones.  If the car you bought in 2003 integrated with a Palm and the one in 2007 with Blackberry both would be pretty useless today.

 

All you really need is integration of your maps/directions and music.  Having it capable of going hands free and enable voice texting is OK for now, but both will probably be banned in most states before long since drivers in a hands free call are very nearly as distracted as those holding the phone - it isn't the driving with one hand that causes problems (many of us do that even when not holding anything) but the conversation itself.

 

The automakers ought to get together and create an open standard that they support and let Android and Apple write to that API.  One wonders what a Fandroid or an Apple fanboy would do if their brand of choice made a deal with the "other guys".  Would they buy a different car, switch their phone, or do without the integration?

Sheetal.Pandey
User Rank
Manager
Re: the android advantage
Sheetal.Pandey   12/18/2013 1:54:51 PM
NO RATINGS
There might not be as much a battle between Android and iOS in automobile sector as its currently seen in smartphones. Are there enough applications that are needed in car that can be supported by these OSs. 

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Industry consortium
junko.yoshida   12/18/2013 1:51:06 PM
NO RATINGS
I am sure I am not alone feeling somewhat weary every time when I hear "industry consortium." It's because a lot of times it is something that got cobbled together for the sake of big announcements.

But in this case, this does make sense.

Nobody wants to write software for a dozen different car companies, right?

You need a standard to which you can write your in-vehicle apps.

Caleb Kraft
User Rank
Blogger
the android advantage
Caleb Kraft   12/18/2013 9:22:41 AM
NO RATINGS
This is quite interesting. I suspect android has a big advantage here since the car manufacturers can make their own version, just like many cell phone providers have done. Apple, being a closed system will have a much harder entry. They would basically need to create a new product that is intended to be the car computer. I can't even really imagine them doing that.

zewde yeraswork
User Rank
Blogger
OEMs
zewde yeraswork   12/18/2013 8:59:57 AM
NO RATINGS
Even if they have a good sense of what' s needed in terms of software for infotainment systems, it'll be interesting to see how long OEMs can stave off the likes of Apple and Google. This is a fascinating market and one with a great deal of opportunity to be had. I would be surprised if more hardware companies aren't preparing offerings for CES 2015 and beyond.

<<   <   Page 3 / 3
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
August Cartoon Caption Winner!
"All the King's horses and all the KIng's men gave up on Humpty, so they handed the problem off to Engineering."
5 comments
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
David Patterson, known for his pioneering research that led to RAID, clusters and more, is part of a team at UC Berkeley that recently made its RISC-V processor architecture an open source hardware offering. We talk with Patterson and one of his colleagues behind the effort about the opportunities they see, what new kinds of designs they hope to enable and what it means for today’s commercial processor giants such as Intel, ARM and Imagination Technologies.