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Intel Edison Aims to Dress Wearables

Quark module rolls in mid-2014
1/7/2014 12:00 PM EST
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chanj0
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Energy Efficiency
chanj0   1/7/2014 1:46:21 PM
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Based on x86 with WiFi and BLE connectivity built in, how does the energy footprint look? The fundemental of wearable is low energy consumption that the ideal runtime of a one charge shall be at least 1 month imo. Nonetheless, given x86 core, the adoption will be high since Edision supports 2 OS and porting of Linux shall be relatively simple.

The strategy is great and if the price point of buying a development board is competitive, Edision might actually gain momentum.

krisi
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Re: Energy Efficiency
krisi   1/7/2014 8:02:17 PM
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I agree energy efficiency is teh key...what is the power dissipation of Edison? Kris

goafrit
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Re: Energy Efficiency
goafrit   1/8/2014 3:30:47 PM
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Intel is reinventing itself. With the resources they have, this company can do a lot of great things. This is potentially a game changer if the power budget is good enough >> the adoption will be high since Edision supports 2 OS and porting of Linux shall be relatively simple>>. I think people have expected this for a long time - having a way to run two OS in one hardware, Intel making it happen means they will possibly lead in this area.

rick merritt
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Hands on experiences
rick merritt   1/7/2014 1:49:39 PM
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I'd love to hear from anyone with hands on experience working with this new Quark module in wearables...or the Quark on an Arduino launched late last year...or any Quark.

betajet
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First electric chair
betajet   1/7/2014 2:23:41 PM
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Gee, I don't know if I want to wear a device named after the company who brought us the first electric chair.

_hm
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Missing MEMS and other sensors
_hm   1/7/2014 3:01:43 PM
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One most important part of wearable SoC is MEMS and many other sensors. Has Intel forgot to integrate them in their device?

Intel should work with other SoC integrator to make this system work.

 

AZskibum
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Re: Missing MEMS and other sensors
AZskibum   1/7/2014 6:37:05 PM
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I was thinking the same thing. Wearables fundamentally need sensors, not just intelligence, connectivity & low energy consumption. But I look forward to seeing what kinds of new products are developed on this new platform.

chanj0
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Re: Missing MEMS and other sensors
chanj0   1/7/2014 9:10:45 PM
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To me, Intel is making a platform to catch the wave of IoT. It is difficult to decide which sensor to put into the system at this point. Yet, I agree with you and I hope Intel has a partnership plan to start integrating Edision with sensors produced by different companies. On the other hands, Intel might actually wish vendors start developing solution based on the platform, hoping for later integration.

NorthTree Associates
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Power consumption and longervity - is it possible?
NorthTree Associates   1/7/2014 3:32:28 PM
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Keeping all the possible devices powered and functional - is there a limitation? The early WiFi days had limitations on distance and the number of WiFi connections that were viable. 

Can this be the new "pager"? (Remember those little buggers?)

 

NorthTree Associates

 

LarryM99
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Form factor is important
LarryM99   1/7/2014 4:38:36 PM
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I like several things about this, not the least of which is the form factor. Wearable devices will need to adapt from the traditional hard box into something that integrates better into whatever they will be put in. I don't know if this one will do it, but kudos to Intel for experimenting. I would also like to see a power scavenging capability. People move, which should generate power. Running clothes are almost a no-brainer, as are clothes for going out on the town dancing.

zewde yeraswork
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Beyond Wintel
zewde yeraswork   1/8/2014 10:42:29 AM
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It seems as though Intel is moving to offer Android and Windows equally for mobile systems, which means it has finally accepted that smartphones and tablets---which it was late to really recognize as equals--are of increasing importance as PCs decline steadily in sales. The Wintel era may be drawing to a close.

goafrit
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Re: Beyond Wintel
goafrit   1/8/2014 3:33:21 PM
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Personally, I do not see anything that will reverse the trend in the declining trajectory of desktop. Any company that ignores mobile cannot be competitive. As Qualcomm eats the pie for everyone, Intel and co cannot wait. ARM has demonstrated a new business model, Intel is catching up but with its resources, it can be competitive as it wants. It has the brainpower, the capability, only the vision is needed.

alex_m1
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good for makers
alex_m1   1/9/2014 6:52:32 AM
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The edison look like a great thing for makers. Since it have both an mcu and an x86 cpu, you could implement an arduino and a raspberry pi in the same mini card. Plus you get both wifi and bluetooth. All this with the power consumption advantages of 22nm finfet(which hopefully the x86 don't kill) and the ability to run x86 binaries. And of course, a prize carying competition.

Two other relevante issues:


1. Peripherials. I'm assuming there are reasonable digital peripherials , but how about analog peripherials ?


2. Easy to use packaging. I'm assuming people will offer it in DIP form ,etc.


3. How soon will intel integrate the arduino firmware ?

John Beans
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Power Comsumption Is Everything
John Beans   1/9/2014 1:33:05 PM
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Intel's achilles heal is its difficulty in evolving its core design philosophies away those that have made it so phenomenally successful in the desktop and server (wide software compatibility, MIPS) to mobile. In mobile, power consumption isn't important, it's EVERYTHING. That's why ARM is doing so well. It's no longer MIPS, it's MIPS/watt.

BLE is compatible with low power, but WiFi and a 400MHz processor probably aren't. Or I should say, I'd love it if they were--who doesn't love WiFi and gobs of processing power?-- but the kinds of applications people will create (if they are not just hobbying around) can be done with a 50MHz processor polling sensors and running a very focused app and the kinds of network stacks and hardware peripheral support provided by the microcontroller vendors.

Edison is the Rasberry Pi of wearables: tiny and cheap and full of possibilities, but probably not what you should use if you have something specific to get done.

Sanjib.A
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Form factor of Intel Edison
Sanjib.A   1/26/2014 12:14:37 AM
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I saw a picture posted in Intel's website about Intel's Edison....it has the size and shape as the SD card. Why choosing the form factor of an SD card? Is it just to depict how small the board would be OR does it also have some conectors like SD card has and would fit into the mating connector if one wants to make some sort of "daughter board" for some sort of application? I think my first assumption is right?

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