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Test Products 2014: Here They Come

1/16/2014 11:10 AM EST
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MeasurementBlues
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DB-9, DE-9
MeasurementBlues   1/16/2014 1:59:36 PM
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Officially called DE-9? (See page 3)

That's what I thought until about a year ago. Everybody thinks DB-9, DB-25, etc. but no.



KB6NU
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Re: DB-9, DE-9
KB6NU   1/24/2014 8:02:12 AM
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That's amusing. Despite using those connectors for longer than I care to mention I never knew that. It's amusing how the letter and number are redundant, too.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: DB-9, DE-9
MeasurementBlues   1/24/2014 8:53:45 AM
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@KB6NU

The letters actually refer to the connector shell size and are really independing of the number of pins. For example, a DB shell could have fewer than 25 pins. Some have two or even three heavy pins (one for power, 2 for return) and some signal pins. The reason the the 9-pin is designated DE is because it was developed after A, B, C, and D, sizes.

KB6NU
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Re: DB-9, DE-9
KB6NU   1/24/2014 9:35:45 AM
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Hmmmmm. That makes sense, too. Now that you mention it, I do recall seeing D connectors with those power pins.

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