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1/28/2014

Servergy's CTS-1000 uses a 32-bit Power-based Freescale P4080 SoC.
Servergy's CTS-1000 uses a 32-bit Power-based Freescale P4080 SoC.

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DMcCunney
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CEO
Re: Low power Power server in DC?:
DMcCunney   1/29/2014 1:36:36 PM
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@rick merritt: Do you see a life for low power Power servers in the data center?

Sure, if they make the grade.

Everyone is after servers with lower power requirements.  Power costs money, and the cooling required to keep servers comfortable costs more money.

Data center operations wnat to reduce thier electric bill and the amount of heat they must dissipate when the servers are running.

Everyone is interested in ARM because ARM CPUs have demonstrated greater power efficiency than Intel Atom processors, but it's not a two horse race.  If folks offering Power based servers can show equivalent power efficiency, equal or better throughput, and competitive pricing, they have a chance.

Kinnar
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CEO
Re: Low power Power server in DC?:
Kinnar   1/29/2014 6:29:34 AM
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Absolutely yes, as the data centers are after power supply cost cutting exercises, that will enable the low power servers getting entered into the business. The article shows that non-Intel ARM bases processor manufactures are really pushing hard to promote the ARM Based Servers.

HardwIntr
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Freelancer
Re: Low power Power server in DC?:
HardwIntr   1/29/2014 3:37:03 AM
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Low power ... Power !! how can IBM do that ? 

rick merritt
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Author
Low power Power server in DC?:
rick merritt   1/28/2014 2:20:40 PM
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Do you see a life for low power Power servers in the data center?

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