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ST Adds Ultra Low-Power 32-Bit ARM MCUs

2/12/2014 06:30 PM EST
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ash.o
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Re: Accuracy of ADC
ash.o   2/19/2014 11:12:30 AM
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From my experience, the ADC is pretty norma since most of TIs comparable chips have a max of 16 bit accuracy with oversampling and are 12 bits in normal op. The power consumption is low here but if I were to chose between an SoC like CC430 or CC2540 and this chip I'd choose TI because of the bluetooth 4.0 or radio on the chips I mentioned and they also happen to be pretty small. We need to see more SoCs with wireless and also ultralow power. For now TI dominates that market I think.

Sanjib.A
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Accuracy of ADC
Sanjib.A   2/16/2014 8:22:24 AM
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The application targeted for this new processor is medical space...what kind of medical devices? This does not seem to be a powerful MCU. Just enough for smaller applications...though it is good see that the tiny MCUs have display controller. Is 16-bit accuracy enough for the medical devices? The ADCs have 12-bit resolution; but 16-bit accuracy is achieved through hardware over-sampling. This could be okay for the medical devices for non-critical applications and for wearable medical electronics devices...and I believe that is what it is targeted for being low power device. There are so many low power MCUs in this space...how does this MCU compares with its competitors?

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