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Engineers On The Big Sceen

3/1/2014 00:00 AM EST
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Susan Rambo
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Re: Journey into Fear (1943)
Susan Rambo   3/1/2014 8:01:50 PM
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Sounds like a good one, Betajet. I'll have to watch it --  Joseph Cotton is the best. I liked the two Thomas Edison biopics from 1940, the first is his childhood Young Tom Edison (1940) with Mickey Rooney and the second Edison, The Man (1940) with Spencer Tracey. I like the lab scene where he and his team going through all those filaments. And then the scene when Edison figures out how sound could be recorded. Apparently the film has at least one big error: Tesla developed alternating current not Edison. I'm sure the film must be full of errors, but it was still enjoyable. I'm sure a more recent film would be more accurate and interesting, but I think an engineer will still like the 1940s versions.

Susan Rambo
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Re: Journey into Fear (1943)
Susan Rambo   3/1/2014 7:40:59 PM
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Thanks betajet. Bru-ha-ha is how the Urban Dictionary spells it. Sorry I didn't catch that. Fixed.

betajet
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Journey into Fear (1943)
betajet   3/1/2014 6:06:55 PM
My favorite engineer movie is Journey into Fear (1943).  Joseph Cotton plays a mild-mannered navy engineer who has just completed some important work in the Middle East during WWII.  He's heading home to report.  The Nazis have decided that killing our hero would help their war effort in a minor way, so they dispatch a very sinister assassin to take him out.  After a failed attempt, the authorities decide it would be safest to send Cotton through the Mediterranean on a small, non-descript freighter that carries a few passengers.  Each passenger is more sinister than the next, and Cotton has no idea whom he can trust, if anyone.  The captain's of no help -- he's drunk and can only speak one word of English.

Amazingly great Film Noir style, with sinister shadows, constant tension, and constant claustrophobia on the freighter.  Features Orson Welles as Turkish Col. Haki.

Do not confuse the B&W 1943 version with the 1975 color version!  I saw five minutes of the 1975 version, with bright colors, lots of daylight, and a nice big ship.  Sheesh.

[By the way, it's spelled "brouhaha".  I've never seen it spelled with hyphens.]

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