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Apple's iOS Codes Get Inside Car

Car OEMs' confusion over smartphone apps integration
3/4/2014 10:20 AM EST
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prabhakar_deosthali
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Re: New to Car Driver Experience
prabhakar_deosthali   3/5/2014 2:20:30 AM
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The confusion related to the placement of various controls differently by different car manufacturers , based upon what OS they are latched onto, can be avoided if their is some govt. standard on the ergononomics of the vital controls - the headlights, the turn signal blinkers, the hazard warning push button, the wiper control lever and so on.

 

Like the basic things as Brake, Accerlarator and clutch have a standard placement in any car you drive ( except when it is left hand vs right hand), these basic things also need to be placed uniformly on whatever HMI is being used by whatever car maker.

 

The rest of the jazzy things related to infotainment can be placed freeky as per the HMI designer's choice.

 

Even with today's simple dashboards , I get confused between my car and may daughter's car - just because the wiper control lever and the turn signal lever have been swapped ( GM Opel Vs Honda Brio). It creates a confusion right in the middle of the traffic !

 

junko.yoshida
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Re: New to Car Driver Experience
junko.yoshida   3/4/2014 6:55:08 PM
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@DrQuine, damn, this is such a good read! You described all the confusion every rental car driver goes through with such vivid details. I was nodding all the way through when I was reading the comment. 

Then, at the very end, you wrote:

Unless we can select our operating system at startup, the day may come when we'll have endorsements on our licenses for the type of vehicles that we're trained to drive (only Apple for me or Android for you).


Jeez. That's exactly what car OEMs are now setting themselves up to, isn't it?

DrQuine
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New to Car Driver Experience
DrQuine   3/4/2014 6:38:06 PM
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The issue of the user interface for a driver who is new to a car is one that must be revisited. As a frequent traveler, I often get introduced to my new car in a dark rental car parking lot when I'm hungry and want to get to the hotel. Already I have to figure out which headlight switch standard has been adopted (dial on the dashboard or stick on the steering column). I also have to figure out how to quickly quench the radio (they typically seem to be set to full blast on an unwanted station). And of course at the end of the trip I have to figure out where the gas cap door release lever is hidden (glove compartment, driver's door, under the steering wheel, or on the floor) to avoid being soaked for rental gar gas refill fees. The dashboard controls, however, are a world in themselves. As a hybrid driver at home, I like to see the miles per gallon displayed. Finding that display can be quite a challenge between pushing buttons on the dashboard display and the steering wheel and on the radio panel. I think that we need to think about a standard convenient user interface and get out of the arcane series of undocumented up / down / right / left clicks that are required to gain basic information. I'm a great fan of Apple products, they are very intuitive - once you know the trick. They can be challenging to navigate until you know "the answer". Unless we can select our operating system at startup, the day may come when we'll have endorsements on our licenses for the type of vehicles that we're trained to drive (only Apple for me or Android for you).

junko.yoshida
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Re: dash chaos
junko.yoshida   3/4/2014 4:44:23 PM
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@Jeff_2, I know; things aren't as clear cut as whose OS is going to drive a car. (although that would be a far easier story to write)

I think you are spot on when you said:

The other problem with multiple levels of APIs is experience shows it's not just more complex but nearly impossible to maintain security on a system like that with multiple providers.


That's a real concern.

krisi
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Re: dash chaos
krisi   3/4/2014 4:34:18 PM
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I will be buying a new car in the fall...sincerely hope it will not have any of these features installed...I have enough IT work with my phones, TVs, laptops etc...to handle, integrate, secure and debug my car would require me to quite my full time job...Kris

JeffL_2
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Re: dash chaos
JeffL_2   3/4/2014 4:18:22 PM
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Hmmm, kind of wish I'd seen the other article first. Not sure what they're trying to do is all that straightforward, and the premise of apps is they're generally "single-purpose programs with a simple function" but if the consumer gets confused they don't buy if they can't understand whether they're getting the right thing. Seems maybe they ought to start with something more like a "GoToMeeting" (remote "desktop") approach and build from there. The other problem with multiple levels of APIs is experience shows it's not just more complex but nearly impossible to maintain security on a system like that with multiple providers.

junko.yoshida
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Re: dash chaos
junko.yoshida   3/4/2014 3:10:17 PM
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I just want everyone to be on the same page here.  When we are talking about smartphone apps integration, we are NOT talking about the OS used inside the car.

We are talking about the first two layers of the software stack above: In-vehicle infotainment apps (IVI apps) and Human-Machin Interface software (HMI software)

More details about the software issues inside the car, please take a look at the following story:

http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?doc_id=1320551

Caleb Kraft
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Re: dash chaos
Caleb Kraft   3/4/2014 2:41:38 PM
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I almost hate to say it, but I think an industry standard "Car OS" (based on linux of course), wouldn't be a bad thing at all. There's no reason it couldn't interface fluidly with all the smart phones out there. The reason I think Linux is an obvious winner here is the ability for all the car companies to modify/customize all the bits that don't have to be part of the standard.


Good luck getting them all to agree on an industry standard though. Also, this obviously isn't meant to replace the operational side of the car's computing, only the human interface/amusement side.

junko.yoshida
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Re: A real "inflection point"
junko.yoshida   3/4/2014 2:35:20 PM
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@Jeff_2, thanks for your kind words. We got the permission to use the diagram from the IHS Automotive analyst. (He is brilliant, by the way)  

Yes, the diagram speaks volume. Automotive markers face so many options when it comes to smartphone apps integration. 

junko.yoshida
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Re: dash chaos
junko.yoshida   3/4/2014 2:32:21 PM
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@Bert, you wrote:

 The image I get is of a separate group in the auto companies, frantically looking for that magic app combination to attract the smartphone crowd (who are reportedly not buying cars as previous generations were), while the other designers are busy doing the "real work." Is that just being cynical?


No, you are not being cynical. That's exactly where car OEMs are at today. Things need to settle down, get sorted out -- technically speaking.  

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