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Why Did It Take GM a Decade to Identify Ignition Switch Problems?

3/4/2014 11:32 AM EST
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Bert22306
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Re: Like Toyota?
Bert22306   3/7/2014 8:02:38 PM
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Here are two articles you MUST read, before making hasty pronouncements:

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1319966

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1319936

Bert22306
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Re: Like Toyota?
Bert22306   3/7/2014 7:48:50 PM
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The software expert showed that there was too much riding on Task X, and that when it crashed, it didn't always reboot itself. Once again, the transcripts that explain this ARE available in the EE Times series of articles, and I'm not sure why you aren't reading them.

adornao
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Re: Like Toyota?
adornao   3/7/2014 7:48:30 PM
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No report, no data, no evidence, no settlement numbers, no nothing. I base my information off what I can see and evaluate with my own understanding not through people who are invested in a case and in a fight for millions of dollars. When everything is under wraps the old way out of date but public reports will have to do.


As I have said repeatedly and you seem to ignore main CPU task X can do whatever it wants as the hardware as a monitor CPU to watch task X so unless they also have a quote for that which you haven't provided with technical info on how task X tricks the monitor CPU even though it is just reading raw sensor data and seeing if it makes sense (100% dual throttle sensor with 0% dual pedal sensor doesn't make sense and no amount of Task X bubling on the main CPU would induce a false ok condition on the monitor CPU)

Bert22306
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Re: Like Toyota?
Bert22306   3/7/2014 7:45:41 PM
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I agree Kris. And I've also manually tested the torque on my ignition switch!

adornao
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Re: Like Toyota?
adornao   3/7/2014 7:44:44 PM
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Again unlike what you asked GM is clearly at fault and at all levels knew about it the most we can say is maybe some strange intense solar radiation knocked out both main (task X) and monitor CPUs without causing them to fail to run the motor while ignoring sensor data at the same time. I think if that is the case then I feel safe driving that car as the probablity of that happening hasn't be demonstrated in many many years unless it is a triple SEU whereby the independent EDR also gets corrupted but legitamate looking sensor data. Or maybe all the sensors read full throttle because they all simultaniously move smoothly to valid limit positions for some foot application reason which has been proven to be the main bulk of the incidents across mfgs. (Note how I said bulk and most as I'm sure one day even a quad redudant system could fail regardless of design but that is highly improbable)

Bert22306
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Re: Like Toyota?
Bert22306   3/7/2014 7:41:32 PM
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Did you even read that news article before posting it,

I followed the series of articles on EE Times very closely, yes, in those months in 2013. There were many exerpts from the Oklahoma hearings posted.

Did you read them yet? This is not pure conjecture anymore. Do yourself a favor and read the transcripts.

The NASA report is way out of date.

adornao
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Re: Like Toyota?
adornao   3/7/2014 7:41:07 PM
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Give me the full report that proves it and then I will consider it but if I don't know the technical details as an engineer I don't think it holds much crediblity.

I doubt the hardware design could mutate between the reports so if what they claim task X on the main CPU can cause the failsafe throttle control to fail my rebut is that the design has a monitor CPU that's very name sake is to monitor task X on independent hardware.

You also failed to read the very article you posted and the only number comes from economic loss cases which is exactly what I'm referring to.

krisi
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Re: Like Toyota?
krisi   3/7/2014 7:38:50 PM
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I think GM is at fault, they clearly were dragging their feet...not sure why Junko thinks it should be regulator role to oversee this...car companies should be responsible for their products

adornao
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Re: Like Toyota?
adornao   3/7/2014 7:38:02 PM
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Did you even read that news article before posting it, unlike the undiscolsed settlements which we can't judge as being won or not the "economic loss cases" where publicly settled for 1.6Billion (Which is probably a win for the class action).

Until we know what thoses select cases settlements are the only one's to proceed to a winning state are the one's we know about it is pure conjecture otherwise.

Task X can command full throttle it doesn't matter as the monitor CPU wouldn't agree and would shut Task X up (And Task X is probably the main CPU entirely as it's sole task if you read the public NASA report is to control the throttle position, while the monitor CPU has the A/D converter (Not a task) and additional fail safe sensing (Not on the main CPU) on top of the main CPU failsafe code to consider the event that the main CPU is corrupted and it's failsafe's are disabled.)

Bert22306
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Re: Like Toyota?
Bert22306   3/7/2014 7:37:04 PM
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By the speed of your replies, you seem to be on constant transmit mode.

The Toyota case is not over. Read that autoblog piece I posted. The Toyota case also has "wrongful deaths" statistics, but the mechanism for the failure mode was not discovered until last year, fourth quarter.

Once the mechanism is discovered and demonstrated, it makes no sense to deny its existence.

Your lighning fast replies tell me you are not reading what is available now.

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