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dotLEDs Are Built for Wearables

3/27/2014 03:30 PM EDT
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Anand.Yaligar
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Re: Life span
Anand.Yaligar   3/30/2014 11:49:39 AM
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All the components used in any wearable device or gadget must have a long life span and this is why components with shorter life spans that might require frequent replacements are usually avoided as much as possible. By extension therefore, these new dotLEDs will have to come with serious clout in the forms of long life spans before they can be taken seriously as the main illuminating components within the design of wearable technology.

Anand.Yaligar
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Re: Power consumption
Anand.Yaligar   3/30/2014 11:42:53 AM
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When it comes to the design of wearable technology, one of the main concerns is usually how to ensure that the device or gadget stays powered up for as long as possible. A direct interpretation of this is that the designers have to ensure that all the components that they use consume the least power possible. And so comes the real question; how much power do these new dotLEDs consume?

wilber_xbox
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Re: Very small
wilber_xbox   3/30/2014 2:27:15 AM
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Wearing lights is still not popular fashion. To me, it looks a bit childish and too flashy. 

elctrnx_lyf
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Re: Very small
elctrnx_lyf   3/28/2014 5:18:35 PM
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A lot of new products can be made possible with the dotLEDs

kadawson
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Re: Very small
kadawson   3/28/2014 11:58:18 AM
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You want small? Here is Toshiba announcing new 0.65mm x 0.65mm die at 5000K, with CCTs down to 2700K under development. Mid-power at 1/4 to 1/2 Watt and luminous efficacy of 130 lm/W claimed at 5000K, 80 CRI. They are manufactured on 8" silicon wafers in the process Toshiba licensed, then bought, from Bridgelux.

The comments on my article at All LED Lighting brought out some, er, interesting aspects I hadn't picked up from the data sheets. Plessey doesn't list a CCT for its 1005 parts. It seems they range from 8000K to 19,000K. There is one heck of a lot of blue coming out of those LEDs.

Toshiba's announcement seems a lot more "real." Also impressively smaller. We could fit over 300 of them on our pinhead.

kadawson
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Re: Very small
kadawson   3/28/2014 11:52:59 AM
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Brent, thanks for the clarification. I was confused too by SAE / metric. One table I found listed 1005 in one standard as 0404 in the other, and vice versa.

Duane Benson
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Re: Very small
Duane Benson   3/28/2014 11:27:21 AM
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Bent - I was trapped by the metric vs. EIA measurement size. 0402 is still small, but not as dramatic as I was thinking.

Bent.Petterson
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Re: Very small
Bent.Petterson   3/28/2014 11:19:27 AM
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Please note this isn't an 01005 part, but an 0402 part by EIA standards. Same size as Rohm, OSRAM, Kingbright, Everlight and others are already manufacturing.

Duane Benson
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Very small
Duane Benson   3/28/2014 10:59:21 AM
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That's a small LED! You don't see the 01005 package used much for other than hearing aids or really specialized applications. I have a feeling, we'll be seeing more and more devices of this size being used in the very near future.

daleste
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small LED
daleste   3/27/2014 6:40:47 PM
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Is this device currently in wearables?  Is it used in the FitBit?

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