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GE Claims Fastest, Highest-Power MEMS Switch
3/28/2014

GE's tiny MEMS switch measures just 100 microns square and yet can switch up to 5 kilowatts of power at 3 GHz. 
(Source: General Electric)
GE's tiny MEMS switch measures just 100 microns square and yet can switch up to 5 kilowatts of power at 3 GHz.
(Source: General Electric)

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elctrnx_lyf
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Break through
elctrnx_lyf   3/28/2014 5:02:38 PM
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Sounds like a huge break through. This could pave way for low power high end phones in future.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Blogger
Re: Break through
R_Colin_Johnson   3/28/2014 5:56:04 PM
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Many companies have been working on MEMS switches over the years--and some, like TeraVicta, have bit the dust--but if GE's MEMS switch works as advertised, their era could finally be here.

_hm
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CEO
Re: Break through
_hm   3/30/2014 8:51:28 AM
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This product will have dual use. It can be very useful for defence electronics.

 

bart.plovie
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Freelancer
Re: Break through
bart.plovie   4/3/2014 6:21:16 PM
First see, then believe. Claiming a device can switch a certain amount of power is a bit of a joke in my opinion unless you mention the test conditions, because certain manufacturers would *cough* never dare *cough* to dip their devices in liquid nitrogen for such tests.

seaEE
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CEO
Re: Break through
seaEE   4/6/2014 12:19:11 AM
Thomas Edison would be proud, as his spirit of inventiveness and innovation is still being carried forward. 

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