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Japan's Chip Fabs Turn to Growing Lettuce
5/19/2014

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Artist's impression of Toshiba cleanroom vegetable facility. (Source: Toshiba)
Artist's impression of Toshiba cleanroom vegetable facility.
(Source: Toshiba)

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MikeMcM1
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Re: lucrative
MikeMcM1   5/22/2014 3:40:17 PM
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Back in the 90's I worked at a company that had its own fab.  The guy that was our head technology person (and who cut his teeth with one of Intel's original fabs) used to say "Not sure why I still this.  It's not too hard to make a good cinnamon roll, the margins are pretty good, and you don't need a million dollar fab to produce them."  As true today as it was then!

docdivakar
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Re: Japan's Chip Fabs Turn to Growing Lettuce
docdivakar   5/21/2014 5:30:52 PM
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A transition to Potato chips from Silicon chips I can understand... BUT lettuce??!! If the Iceberg's can be grown without pesticides (as the article alludes to) in a cost-competitive way, perhaps there is a business case for this!

MP Divakar

mursu
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Semi-lettuce
mursu   5/20/2014 4:44:07 PM
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Sounds like a story you'd be more likely to read on April 1st...

Miguelito1
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Why would the lettuce stay fresher?
Miguelito1   5/20/2014 11:45:22 AM
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The article says there are no germs or dust so no pesticides are needed.  That makes sense.  If there are no pests, there is no need to kill them.  This does not mean the lettuce will stay fresher longer.

elctrnx_lyf
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Manager
lucrative
elctrnx_lyf   5/20/2014 5:13:59 AM
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May be this is more lucrative business than semiconductors.

 

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