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Intel Goes Wireless With Resonant Power

6/12/2014 07:50 AM EDT
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nhamthoi
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Intel
nhamthoi   6/13/2014 12:26:12 AM
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Intel's technology and their work. I think wireless carriers will compete more strongly. Y8Y8 | Girl Games


RahulRazdan6
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Resonant Power
RahulRazdan6   6/13/2014 11:33:58 AM
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I am curious.  Has either Witricity or Intel shown a practical implementation of this technology which is price effective and robust in real-world conditions ?  

FYI.. I was the CEO of WiPower (now part of Qualcomm)  and at least 3-4 years ago,  there were significant issues with practical implementations for resonnant power.

 

horta1212
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Re: Resonant Power
horta1212   6/13/2014 1:32:03 PM
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I don't believe they have. That's the reason why we have charging bowls. Long range energy transmission hasn't been shown to be feasible using magnetics. I'm surprised they haven't started going into infrared lasers or microwaves with tracking technology instead.

y_sasaki
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Re: Resonant Power
y_sasaki   6/13/2014 5:03:17 PM
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I like high-power IR laser steering idea. It should have cockroach-killing capability too.

zeeglen
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Re: Resonant Power
zeeglen   6/13/2014 5:12:28 PM
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Two questions:

With implications for RFI and FCC issues, what frequency do they use?

What happens to the mag strip on a credit card if you stand too close?

_hm
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Power and charging for Intel?
_hm   6/14/2014 2:12:21 PM
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Why suddenly Intel is interested in power and charging? This is look a low level task with minimal profit. What Intel will earn from this?

Sanjib.A
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Re: Resonant Power
Sanjib.A   6/15/2014 1:55:37 PM
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" That's the reason why we have charging bowls..." I believe Intel's charging bowl also works based on the resonance technology...isn't it? Looks to me that Intel is promoting resonance technology based charging.

C VanDorne
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Re: Power and charging for Intel?
C VanDorne   6/16/2014 10:27:21 AM
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From Intel's statement:

"We have overwhelming feedback from end users that they are frustrated with dealing with all the different wires and power adapters for their devices..."

So my guess is that they dissagree with the low-profitability prospect. They're betting these people, and later...you, will pay a premium for something better in this mundane area.

C VanDorne
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CEO
From WiTricity's webstie:
C VanDorne   6/16/2014 11:06:59 AM
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"WiTricity power sources and capture devices are specially designed magnetic resonators that efficiently transfer power over large distances via the magnetic near-field."

Setting asside the contradiction of terms: "large-distances" and "near-field", I would like to know how efficient this transfer is.  Ideally it would be 1:1, correct?  Or does resonance enable 1:x, where x > 1?  Now that would be something!  I've long held the belief that there is an element, or combination of elements, out there that when excited by an EM wave of some kind would actually produce more power than the excitation source provides.  An exercise of chemical engineering, I suppose, but is this it?

Jessica Lipsky
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Re: From WiTricity's webstie:
Jessica Lipsky   6/16/2014 1:12:24 PM
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I think that's one of the major problems with wireless charging - actual efficiency. Seems like the industry groups don't want to give actual speed specs, but other pubs have tackled this problem: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/11/look-ma-no-wires-a-mini-review-of-googles-nexus-wireless-charger/

I think one of the main issues with mass adoption of wirless charging is that, at the moment, it's not terribly necessary. I don't have trouble plugging in my device normally, but don't want to purchase the infrastructure to do it wirelessly. Is wireless charging something that the public really wants?

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