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6 Keys to Navigating Connected Car's Software Quagmire

7/8/2014 02:00 AM EDT
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DCH0
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Rookie
It is not getting them to work together, it is getting them to stay apart
DCH0   7/15/2014 7:32:39 PM
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The biggest problem I see is network security (like Target card readers being attacked through an entry from a refrigeration vendor).  With lots of Android virsuses running loose, there needs to be isolation between systems to pass data without allowing the functionality to be attacked.

xzczvxc
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Rookie
What about Mirrorlink/CCC?
xzczvxc   7/10/2014 6:10:27 AM
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The Car Connectivity Consortium (CCC) is dedicated to developing global standards for phone-centric car connectivity solutions. Since its inception in February 28, 2011 the CCC has grown to 94  members.  These members are among the world's leading automotive, mobile communications, and consumer electronics industry companies, representing more than 70%  of the worldwide market share in vehicles and more than 60%  of the worldwide market share in smartphones. 

http://www.mirrorlink.com

goafrit
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Manager
Re: Software issues brought on by Connected Cars
goafrit   7/9/2014 8:55:26 PM
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>> Getting different devices wirelessly connected inside a car is begnning to happen.

The biggest problem in the industry is that they are not collaborating in this. When you see the level of efforts they put in harmonizing the evolution of MEMS and its sensory functions in cars, one could expect better when it comes to connected cars. The interest is not there. If auto makers have unified standards, the three main suppliers - Conti, TRW, and Bosch will invest and make things to work seamlessly. There are few companies whose parts make it into any car.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Obsolescence
junko.yoshida   7/9/2014 3:08:22 PM
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tb100, you make a good argument. It's true that "open source" sounds good, but who will stay in charge and in control of updating the efforts for the group matters a great deal. It is important to note, though, in the automotive world, nobody is ignoring Genivi. Companies who are providing various layers of software are mindful of Genivi and they are trying to make their solutions pluggable to Genivi. 

tb100
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CEO
Obsolescence
tb100   7/8/2014 9:19:23 PM
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Smartphone development happens so fast, that implementing too many features into the car itself would make the car obsolete pretty quickly. The Android phone I had last year wouldn't run a lot of the new apps coming out today. Imagine a car becoming obsolete within a year.

I prefer what some of the car companies are doing now: QNX as the middleware, with an interface to work with Android and iOS apps. I can't imagine the car companies picking a system that is exclusive to Android or iOS, pushing a lot of customers away who prefer the one they didn't pick.

And I wouldn't trust an industry consortium solution (GENIVI) to be sole middleware, to have to reliably support Apple and Google and all the many car companies including the many changes that are constantly occuring, compared to a dedicated commercial company (QNX).

In fact, historically this has not worked, and Tizen is a perfect example of this.

There was once something called LiMo, which was an industry consortium to develop an open source Linux cell phone. There were a lot of members including Motorola, Panasonic, Arm, Samsung, Wind River, Marvell, NTT, and Verizon . They came out with phones about the same time as Android. Guess what happened?  Android moved much faster, and sold phones.

All these years later, LiMo still manages to exist, as Tizen, and I think the only thing they've come out with recently is a Samsung watch, and Samsung's latest smartwatches no longer even use Tizen. 

JanineLove
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Re: Test
JanineLove   7/8/2014 4:34:42 PM
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I know automtobile manufacturers have stringent requirements for quality in the individual systems/components/parts due to the long life span of automobiles. But what are they doing in regards to interoperability standards?

junko.yoshida
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Re: Test
junko.yoshida   7/8/2014 4:31:45 PM
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Exactly, Janine. 

And carmakers can't keep just adding those features and functions forever. They need to be architected as a part of the overall system from day one -- otherwise, testing becomes a never-ending effort that will end up unmanageable. 

JanineLove
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Test
JanineLove   7/8/2014 4:13:45 PM
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Hi @Junko, it seems that one of the greatest challenges is figuring out how to sufficiently test the software in these systems. The expansion (some might say 'bloating') of code is a problem in many markets. And, while infotainment isn't "mission critical," I expect consumers will set a high bar for performance within their vehicle. Manufacturers will want to get it right.

junko.yoshida
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Blogger
Software issues brought on by Connected Cars
junko.yoshida   7/8/2014 1:30:35 PM
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Getting your cars wirelessly connected to the outside world has been done. Getting different devices wirelessly connected inside a car is begnning to happen. Meanwhile, drivers and passengers will continue to bring their own devices inside a car and car OEMs surely need a strategy for it.

The uninteded consequence brought on by connected cars is the proliferation of software -- i mean different layers of software. It's complicated. It's certainly a quagmire. The story is intended to drain that quagmire. 

 

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