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17 More NASA Images of Beautiful Engineering

7/17/2014 04:31 PM EDT
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jcchagnon
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Re: Flying Spheres
jcchagnon   7/21/2014 10:01:48 AM
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Indeed!

prabhakar_deosthali
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Editor - Pl remove
prabhakar_deosthali   7/21/2014 8:23:18 AM
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The comment just below looks to be a SPAM.

 

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aktif3123
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Re: Flying Spheres
aktif3123   7/21/2014 7:39:28 AM
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ben yetimim... vayyy... ayakkabi sandvic panel seo tabela izmir karting

DrBunsenH
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Re: Flying Spheres
DrBunsenH   7/21/2014 4:57:42 AM
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I was thinking more of the 'mapping spheres' from "Prometheus" the film.  Drop them down the hole and let them get on with it - well worth the mobile roaming charges.

AZskibum
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Thanks for the memories
AZskibum   7/20/2014 10:52:17 PM
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I have enjoyed this and other celebrations of the Apollo program in the media this week. I remember very well following the Apollo missions in my childhood, and they strongly encouraged my pursuit of math, science and engineering.

bk11
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Firday pun
bk11   7/18/2014 12:03:59 PM
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A smartphone in space?  The roaming charges would be astronomical!

jcchagnon
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Flying Spheres
jcchagnon   7/18/2014 11:57:49 AM
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Well, the flying spheres from Stargate Universe are finally here.

toney
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Thye lunar landing was dependent on the transistor
toney   7/18/2014 11:32:23 AM
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No transistor, no IC, NO GO.

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