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Intel Core M Puts PC Back on Map

New 14nm processor for 2-in-1s could soar x86
9/5/2014 11:30 AM EDT
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Sanjib.A
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CEO
Re: How does it renspond to the market ?
Sanjib.A   9/9/2014 10:31:39 PM
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@R_Colin_Johnson: Thank you for the price info! Okay then that sounds like $280 for 1K is a volume price and I don't think it would ever come down to the extent of $150 for higher volume.

Bruzzer
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Freelancer
Haswell Desktop / Mainstream, IV E EOL?
Bruzzer   9/8/2014 4:28:04 PM
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There is a massive broker channel correction this week.

IVY E broker inventories drop by 95%.

Haswell i7 Desktop broker inventories drop by 77%.

Haswell i5 Desktop broker inventories drop by 76%.

Haswell i3 Desktop broker inventories drop by 73%.

Pentium Desktop broker inventories drop by 54%.

i7/i5/i3 mobile down 12%.

Has Intel EOL'd Haswell?

Integrators buying up Haswell off spot market to support existing board inventories?

Intel buys up broker surplus clearing channels of slow selling sludge?

Intel provides first tier dealing group price protection?

Is Haswell on Intel IDM cost : price a better mainstream price performer than Broadwell?

Mike Bruzzone, Camp Marketing

Bruzzer
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Freelancer
Core M Economics & Y Series Production
Bruzzer   9/8/2014 3:08:41 PM
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What Intel and their top tier analyst's aren't saying, is that Intel has flooded world market channels with three generations of product; Sandy, Ivy and Haswell.  A traditional competitive strategy that consumes the channel's financial ability to stock anything else, meaning competitive processor offerings, and now Intel processor's too.  This is a predicament solely of Intel's own making, and in time frame accompanies the every eight year architectural design obsolescence slow down. 

As a result of Intel flooding world market channels, in a tragedy of the commons, only hardware platforms offering end buyer application's utility values, and the novel innovations, will sell through Intel's own self imposed competitor's surplus barrier. 

The reason is that compliment channels will not lose their investment in existing stocks.  To do so means out of the Intel compliment business on loss of development funds; where Intel's channel concentration strategy is also at work here.  And the channel is well aware of this, knowing Intel first tier dealing group will be paid, by Intel, to move new processors into channels as an offset to their risk of inventory losses.

No doubt Core M, Broadwell PC, Haswell 2600v3 will be produced in low volumes vs. prior product runs.  Intel will pay its first tier dealer group for board development & marketing leaving many disadvantaged.  So this is a great time to design around components, other than Intel components, meeting the criteria of end buyer application utility values primarily, and then taking some risk in innovation markets ahead of broad adoption.

Specific to Core M, Intel Y Series processors currently represent a miniscule 2.6% of all Haswell dual core mobile; i7 variants  .oo1%, i5 variants 51%, i3 variants 46% and Pentium 2%.  Most popular is i5 4210Y at 41% of production followed by i3 4020Y at 26% of production.  Average weighed 1K price across Y short run is $265.59.  Where the simple rule of thumb is divide by 2 for Intel 1st Tier Dealer price.  Noteworthy Core M 1K price at $281 is above the Haswell Y power sort average weighed by $16.

Considering the design production economics of Broadwell Core M, this is an expensive 2.5 part.  Anand reports 83mm^2 of silicon; processor & I/O hub on PCB.  Quick economic calc suggests the component's average marginal cost to produce is no less than Haswell i3 dual mobile SIP range $35 to $39. 

This analyst suggests initial Core M parts will be produced in very limited volume primarily supporting first tier dealers.

Mike Bruzzone, Camp Markleting

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: How does it renspond to the market ?
R_Colin_Johnson   9/8/2014 12:00:33 PM
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> @Sanjib: $280 is not a volume price correct? I asked Intel your questions about volume and they said: "1Ku pricing of the Core™ M processor is $281. System price points are up to our customers to set but we expect Core M based platforms to be initially priced at the levels of Core™ processor 2 in 1 systems in the market today. As the numbers of designs and volumes increase, we anticipate system price points to react accordingly."

Sanjib.A
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Re: How does it renspond to the market ?
Sanjib.A   9/8/2014 10:11:55 AM
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@R_Colin_Johnson: I think 700 times more performance at 25% of power shall definitely be a "wow" factor. But I guess the price $260 is not a volume price correct? What would be the price for high volume (~10000 per annum)? What is a chance that an industrial version of the Core M would be launched for industrial PCs?

ChipMaster0
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Core M BIG Regress
ChipMaster0   9/8/2014 9:46:05 AM
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More like the opposite. Core M is setting PCs back on performance, by giving them sub-Celeron performance.

Gil Russell
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Manager
No Mention of Ultrabook
Gil Russell   9/8/2014 9:26:02 AM
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Whatever happened to the Ultrabook branding? Announced at IDF 2011 it just failed away - now Intel is once again back at it, but this time around:

"Now with the Generation 5 Core M processors, Intel is trying to squeeze its ultrabook caliber of performance into the smaller form factor of a 2-in-1, bridging the gap between the premium-tablets and -laptops market all in one light-weight, low-power unit."

MacBook Air was announced in early 2008 and took in 56% of ultrabook sales in North America through July 2013 though it was the highest price of the Ultrabook competitors. Apple is master of preserving meaningful product margins.

Intel's customer base, excluding Apple, have been asking what the company can do for them. Microsoft is not mentioned in the article but is a big sticking point. Very few in the upgrade position will mount Win 8. Simply put it is still a Win 7 market.

The good news is Intel has found its 14 nm FinFet mojo and is back with what appears (so far) to be a very competitive offering. 

Let the price haggling begin...,

 

spike_johan
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Rookie
I agree.
spike_johan   9/8/2014 9:18:22 AM
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Ultrabooks were overpriced and underspec'd. And Android is a very unappealing solution because the apps are unintegrated, the UI is fractured, and many of the the software releases appear to be untested.

And while Apple might work oh so well, it is - as we all know - a closed ecosystem.

So welcome back Wintel. This product offering sounds promising. The price-point seems realistic given the performance.

But these new products will only really take off if we the consumer get two things: Accessable/replaceable parts (like RAM, batteries, SSDs/HDDs) and an OS that looks more like Win7.

Nick105
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Rookie
refresh rate
Nick105   9/8/2014 8:32:29 AM
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I think the belief that consumers are going to "refresh" every 1-2 years at a cost of ~$699 is highly unrealistic.

Gondalf
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Freelancer
Re: How does it renspond to the market ?
Gondalf   9/7/2014 6:11:26 PM
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Double of what?? Give me an SKU with the same CPU and GPU performance and plataform capabilities in this class. I hope it is not a Mullins because......i'll laugh.

Peoples pay the convertible not the cpu, it is not Intel fault if OEMs have so high prices for very slim windows PCs. 

 

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