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Will Artificial Hearts Be Next Big Thing in Medtech?

9/12/2014 11:00 AM EDT
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DrQuine
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CEO
Re: Cost of healthcare - and artificial heart trends
DrQuine   9/21/2014 1:18:47 PM
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@jessicalipsky "Zoltan Istvan says "millions will electively line up for [the artificial heart] when it becomes available, even if they have healthy biological hearts."

I can't imagine why people with health hearts would line up for artificial one. Not only are natural hearts much more reliable, they are cheaper, they are quieter, and they don't require battery maintenance.

Certainly there have been many variations of artificial hearts over the past few decades with a variety of capabilities regarding the need for tethers and power supplies. I pleased to hear that the free standing artificial heart technology is moving ahead as a short term "solution". I'd predict, however, that in the ten year timeframe that "natural" biological hearts grown from human stem cells will prove to be a much more viable solution. They'll avoid the need for anticoagulant blood therapy and they'll serve as maintenance-free replacements. Ideally they'll be grown from a universal donor tissue type so that there will be no issues associated with tissue rejection, they'll be in inventory as needed, and they'll avoid replicating any cardiovascular genetic defects in the recipient.

kfield
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Re: Cost of healthcare
kfield   9/15/2014 3:07:24 PM
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@jessicalipsky "Zoltan Istvan says "millions will electively line up for [the artificial heart] when it becomes available, even if they have healthy biological hearts." I'm no expert in economics, but won't this lead to an enormous spike in the (already high) cost of healthcare? Or, conversely, if a mass of people sign up to get these artificial hearts, could it improve upon the transplant procedure and normalize the device to drive down costs? "

I believe that a surge in demand by people who don't need a new heart would:

A. Fund the learning curve (as what health care insurance would pay for an unneeded procedure?

B. Improve the process

 

 

Jessica Lipsky
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Cost of healthcare
Jessica Lipsky   9/15/2014 10:49:12 AM
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Zoltan Istvan says "millions will electively line up for [the artificial heart] when it becomes available, even if they have healthy biological hearts." I'm no expert in economics, but won't this lead to an enormous spike in the (already high) cost of healthcare? Or, conversely, if a mass of people sign up to get these artificial hearts, could it improve upon the transplant procedure and normalize the device to drive down costs? 

Sheetal.Pandey
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Manager
Re: Good news
Sheetal.Pandey   9/15/2014 2:37:48 AM
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Sure artificial heart can help many needy patients to live their lives. But to make it more common, I guess lot of other restrictions also have to follow like people with artificial heart cannot bring smartphones or other electronics close to themselves or any other radiation kind of thing.

collin0
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Rookie
Good news
collin0   9/15/2014 12:30:34 AM
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The news about artificial hearts is quite excited.

There are all kinds of artificial human organ. I think the manmade hearts would be the most difficult to be made.

To transplant the replaced hearts to the patients with heart disease is not a big problem nowadays. The key note is that what kind of artificial heats are fit for the human body best.

Wish the better method and technology coulde be created in the near future.

betajet
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CEO
The Girl with the Prefabricated Heart
betajet   9/14/2014 7:53:58 PM
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Venus was made out of sea-foam,
Venus was made out of brine;
But the girl of today,
If she is grade A,
Is assembled upon the assembly line...


These are the opening verses of The Girl with the Prefabricated Heart, segment created and directed by artist/filmmaker Fernand Léger, in Dreams that Money Can Buy (1947), probably one the most creative movies you've never heard of.

Sanjib.A
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CEO
Heart & Kidney: Need urgent synthetic alternatives
Sanjib.A   9/14/2014 2:44:50 AM
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Heart and kidney are the two organs for which there is a desperate need of synthetic replacements. I was reading a news today morning about approximately 1,80,000 patients in India need kidney replacement. It was an alarming number!! Whereas the organs donated would be significantly lesser compared to the demand. I do not know about the patients needing heart replacement, but I am pretty sure that the number would be high too unfortunately. Hence any such news about successful clinical trials of artificial organs are welcome! I read somewhere that the weight of these artificial hearts are still significantly more compared to the human heart? How much does the CARMAT's synthetic heart weighs?

 

zeeglen
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Blogger
Prosthesis
zeeglen   9/13/2014 1:31:30 PM
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Research and development of medical prosthesis devices will be far more beneficial to society than attempted replacement of the human mind with autonomous vehicles.

DonaldGIsaacs
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Rookie
Carmat has only done two implants
DonaldGIsaacs   9/12/2014 4:50:18 PM
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Since 1969 1,413 Artificial Hearts have been implanted in humans.


Over 1,350 of these devices were the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart and its predecessors.

Dig deeper and get the facts at syncardia.com


Don Isaacs
SynCardia Systems, Inc.
disaacs@syncardia.com

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