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Design as a Craft, Not a Commodity

9/25/2014 12:15 PM EDT
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Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: What do the people want?
Sheetal.Pandey   9/30/2014 2:08:28 PM
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Yes the IOT products must be a craft, made with choice and with lot of understanding. It can be less technical but more towards what user wants, and how the data is interpreted and presented matters a lot.

docdivakar
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Re: What do the people want?
docdivakar   9/26/2014 4:24:16 PM
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@LarryM99: your point well taken.

Let me bring up an example of a company where I used to work that rewarded its employees with a free waist band pedometer about a decade ago (long before the Chinese knockouts made them throw aways these days!). The intent was to get more employees to walk during lunch hours, evenings and weekends. They also gamified it by awarding give aways like movie tickets, etc. In the beginning, there were few takers but once employees started seeing names of those walked on a score board, it wasn't about give aways any more, it was more of an ego issue. In that process, employee health was the winner!

Insurace companies can offset the cost of wearables in a freemium model. I am sure there are other business nuances here that the marketing folks can brainstorm for wearables.

I agree with your observation on the security and sanctity of personal health data. This has to be guaranteed if consumers were to adopt wearables in medical/personal health applications.

MP Divakar

LarryM99
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Re: What do the people want?
LarryM99   9/26/2014 1:46:35 PM
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@docdivakar, there are still some creepiness / privacy issues around health information that may delay or complicate a freemium model, depending on what use is made of the information that is collected. I can certainly imagine Google salivating at the advertising possibilities of placing a sensor package on everyone on the planet. On the other hand, I can imagine real benefits to individuals and society from that as well. Until we get a balance between those two I would just as soon maintain relatively tight control of my personal data.

Larry M.

docdivakar
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Re: What do the people want?
docdivakar   9/26/2014 1:18:00 PM
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@LarryM99: good points below.

If the wearables can do things better than what we are accustomed to, there is definitely value in using them. This would imply that the basic function of wearable devices is to report the sensed data to one's handset or a home computer. Either one of the foregoing "base stations" have to perform the function of comparing the baseline / historical data and generate the appropriate responses / actions as required, like the examples you quoted, including generating alerts at the sensing location (audible / visual / haptic).

In a workshop I hosted & moderated yesterday in the Silicon Valley ("Billions of IoT for Every One"), one of the questions I posed was why no one in the wearable market offers a freemium model? Before one dismisses this business model completely, I think there is potential here to explore more indepth, particularly for personal health.

MP Divakar

LarryM99
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Re: What do the people want?
LarryM99   9/25/2014 5:48:08 PM
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This is similar to the discussions about why people would want a PC, back when that was a real question. The best answer that I heard was when someone referred to the Apple II as a Visicalc machine. The early adopters work with the raw technology, and in the case of these devices are fascinated with the statistics that can be gathered. The mass market wants it to do something useful, prefereably with the technology being as hidden as possible.

Suggestions:
  • Turn off the TV because the only person in the room has fallen asleep. Also set the DVR to record the rest of the program.
  • Call a caregiver because grandpa's blood sugar has gone out of range. If there is no response, call a secondary or eventually 911.
  • Keep someone whose blood alcohol level is above a level from operating a car. Any car.

These applications collect data for a function, rather than just to be analyzed. Once a sensor set is in place it can be used for multiple functions. The functions are what is important to mass-market users.

Larry M.

Jessica Lipsky
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What do the people want?
Jessica Lipsky   9/25/2014 2:37:54 PM
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I hear a lot of discussion fom industry people about the need to analyze data from our smart/wise devices, but what do users want? There seems to be very little upswelling from users who are demanding a certain kind of information. What do you want analyzed?

docdivakar
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Re: Design as a Craft
docdivakar   9/25/2014 2:34:35 PM
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The comment by the speaker "... it's not enough to collect data; there's a need to analyze that data for the benefit of the user..." says a lot about why many wearables' users stop using them after a month or two. I just got my FitLife yesterday and I hope I will still be wearing it three months from now.

It is not enough for the gizmo makers to bring them out to market with an app, they need to encourage many third party developers to add value thru creative applications.

MP Divakar

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