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TI Beefs Up Driver Assist, Digital Cockpit

Coming fusion of infotainment and ADAS
10/21/2014 09:35 AM EDT
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Anand.Yaligar
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Re: Adaptive cruise control?
Anand.Yaligar   10/23/2014 11:14:00 PM
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Buggy software will always be the issue if we are trying to tie down transport systems to entire sensor networks, and V2V systems will always get the brunt for the buggy software. However, if Adaptive Cruise Control works out well enough, then the car will try to mimic the behaviour of other cars in the area.

Anand.Yaligar
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Re: A path to self driving vehicle
Anand.Yaligar   10/23/2014 11:10:34 PM
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Most cars will feature the autopilot trend that Tesla has been setting of late, and the laws will be enforced for those drivers that were holding the steering wheel when the accident happened. With all these sensors about, I dont think there would be much accidents because cars will be able to communicate with each other.

chanj0
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A path to self driving vehicle
chanj0   10/23/2014 12:07:42 PM
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This seems to be a path to self driving vehicle. The lane assist, collision avoldance and adaptive cruise control which are availiable in multiple vehicles already will be tested and data will be collected. If they are functioned as they are designed to, the same algorithm will certainly be used in the self driving vehicle.

The question is whether drivers are held responsible in case accident happened with all these advanced feature. Do we need to sign a T&C before buying a vehicle now? Or simply, [AGREE] button on the dashboard everytime the car is started. ;)

AZskibum
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Re: Two types of ADAS processors
AZskibum   10/22/2014 7:35:15 AM
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Even if both processors are ISO 26262 certified (and maybe both are), TI apparently sees markets for both. Not every car maker or car buyer interested in ADAS is going to want the ADAS to take control of the car.

rajkp
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What's wrong with actually DRIVING your car?
rajkp   10/22/2014 3:18:32 AM
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Gears, Clutch, Brake, Accelerator, Steering. Five items to control in order to drive. Why does anyone need a computer to handle any of this? Quite frankly, if you can't control your car and pay attention to the road and your surroundings, you shouldn't even get behind the wheel. More tech makes for more lazy drivers, reliant on the computer controlled systems to do what they should be doing. Experience and diligence makes a good driver, not electronic gizmos. How many people will be tempted to drink and drive, or drive while tired, hoping that their technically advanced car will handle braking and steering? Who will be accountable for accidents - the driver or the car manufacturer?

I think what would be a good idea to include in all cars with this type of technology is a recording system which could log all incidents where the car had to take over control of braking or steering in order to avoid a collision. This could then be checked annually or after an accident to see if the driver was actually in control of their vehicle or if the car was taking control too often. The dashboard could also flag up the tally of incidents to the driver to keep them aware of their driving. This type of thing would not make a good selling point though, so is unlikely to happen.

zeeglen
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Adaptive cruise control?
zeeglen   10/21/2014 6:50:22 PM
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Adaptive cruise control?  What exactly is this?  From the name i assume it adjusts itself to match the speed of traffic around you.  So when everyone else is doing 20 over the limit, your vehicle will too.

Let me relate a tale about the cruise control in my 2008 Chevy Cobalt.  Three typical buttons - On/Off; Enable/Reduce speed; Resume/Accelerate - simple, right? How could anything so simple have a software bug?

In my daily commute home there is a downslope into a little gully followed by an upslope.  At the beginning of the downslope the posted speed limit changes from 35mph to 40mph.  One would think that pushing the Accelerate button 5 times should accomplish this.

Two glitches - first, when the vehicle speeds up to 40mph as a result of the downslope, it is not just a matter of pressing the Enable/Reduce speed button to register the newly attained speed.  Because the cruise is already enabled it interprets this button press as Reduce speed.  To use this button the cruise control has to be turned Off then On again (typical for software).

Second, when the vehicle is travelling faster than the set speed of 35mph such as coasting downhill it ignores commands to accelerate.  The 5 pushes on the Accelerate button do not register until the vehicle has started to climb the upslope and speed falls to 35mph - THEN it accelerates to 40mph.  Meanwhile the guy behind me is already trying to do 40.

Interesting how un-anticipated scenarios like this can flabbergast software.  And they think they can design a foolproof V2V system?

 

junko.yoshida
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Re: Two types of ADAS processors
junko.yoshida   10/21/2014 5:43:18 PM
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@moswald542, good point. So, those processors which are not ISO 26262-rated will refrain from taking actions (like stopping a car when in danger) and just stick to displaying ADAS info?

moswald542
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Re: Two types of ADAS processors
moswald542   10/21/2014 3:15:38 PM
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The distinction is not so much between smart and not so smart ADAS, but rather between safe (ISO 26262 safety rated) and not.

junko.yoshida
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Two types of ADAS processors
junko.yoshida   10/21/2014 11:37:36 AM
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TI is essentially rolling out two different types of ADAS processor families.

One family (TDAx) that process ADAS information and can act on the data by actually stopping a car when in danger.

Another is a family of infotainment processors (Jacinto 6) whose extra processing power can now process some ADAS applications and display such information.

TI calls the first one "safety-critical" ADAS processors and the second one "informational" ADAS processors.

In other words, all ADAS is not equal. Are we heading for the future for two separate ADAS implemtations -- "smart" ADAS and not so smart ADAS?

 

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