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Moore's Law Competitor Wins $150K Elevator Pitch Prize

11/27/2014 00:00 AM EST
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R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: cool and amazing applications
R_Colin_Johnson   12/1/2014 1:16:02 PM
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Thanks for the question about what types of prototypes have they built. Apparently a lot. And in diverse fields. Many are now going into production in 2015--licened from IlC. Here is the list of their prototypes so far sent by IIC: IIC has built multiple demonstration vehicles to experimentally verify different benefits of Quilt Packaging technology. Some of this information has been made public, and some of it is confidential to a specific customer. Below is a list of some of what we've already demonstrated: Application Space: Large format arrays (infrared scene projector/detector arrays) Built: 2x2 array of QP'd Si chips demonstrating less than 10 micron chip-to-chip gap and sub-micron alignment accuracy. Built: 2x2 array of QP'd GaAs chips demonstrating less than 15 micron chip-to-chip gap and sub-micron alignment accuracy. Built: 1x2 array of QP'd Si chips that also had a very large array of TSV's (through-silicon-vias) to demonstrate QP + TSV fabrication compatibility. Also had <10 um chip gap and sub-micron accuracy. Application Space: Microwave systems (radio frequency systems operating into the 100's of GHz) Built: 2-chip quilt of High-Resistance Silicon chips and tested microwave performance to 220 GHz (demonstrated less than 1 dB insertion loss from DC to 220 GHz) Built 2-chip quilt of GaAs-GaAs chips and tested microwave performance to 220 GHz (demonstrated 2.2 dB insertion loss to 220 GHz, this was published in Dec 2013 IEEE Microwaves Letters). Built: 2-chip heterogeneous quilt of GaAs-Si and tested microwave performance to 220 GHz (demonstrated less than 1 dB insertion loss from DC-220 GHz) Application Space: Power electronics Built: Utilizing left-over sample chips, built 2-chip Si quilt that had 30-micron-wide interconnects. Passed over 5 amps of current through the interconnects before the test setup failed, but no damage to interconnect or chips. We were attempting to verify simulations that indicated we could pass up to 11 amps through the connection. Again, the test setup failed before the chips did. We are working on an updated test vehicle for this at the moment. Application Space: MEMS & 3D systems Built: Utilizing left-over sample chips, assembled a proof-of-concept demonstration of plugging chips in a "daughter card" like fashion into a "motherboard" chip. We are working on an updated test vehicle for demonstration of this at the moment. Built: Fabricated "mini PCBs" from large Si chips with signal redistribution layers, populated with packaged and discrete devices, and quilted into a larger assembly. Misc: IIC has demonstrated extreme thermal shock by dunking quilted chips (mounted and not-mounted) in liquid nitrogen multiple times without failure. Gary Bernstein's group at the University of Notre Dame has also performed some reliability and pull-test studies using silicon QP test articles. IIC has performed thermal cycle, thermal shock, and drop tests on a variety of quilted test articles with very promising results---there do not appear to be any showstoppers. Scott Howard's group at Notre Dame has fabricated a preliminary test vehicle demonstrating QP for optical waveguide alignment. There are over 20 peer-reviewed publications on QP from a variety of researchers (not just ND or IIC), and it is also mentioned in the 2009 and 2011 ITRS Roadmap Assembly & Packaging Chapters (2013 ITRS on Packaging isn't out yet, but it should be in there too). QP appears in the Exascale Computing Study published in 2008 (this is QP for supercomputers, it is a viable application but not one we pursue very aggressively as IIC since it is so complex and expensive to even get started with). The idea is that QP can save a lot of power in next-gen supercomputer systems (this could also be applied to server farms).

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: cool and amazing applications
R_Colin_Johnson   12/1/2014 12:02:51 PM
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I know they have built prototypes quilting together different process technologies, but not exactly what functions they performed. I query the company and get you an answer.

chipmonk0
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Re: cool and amazing applications
chipmonk0   12/1/2014 11:51:06 AM
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This quilting thing will certainly appeal to the readers of Popular Mechanics but how viable is it re: actual electrical routing ? Has this Co. built any electrical Test Vehicles ? If so with what sort of devices / chips ?

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: cool and amazing applications
R_Colin_Johnson   11/30/2014 2:22:48 PM
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You both are right. In fact, the QP guys themselves said they were surprized when they got a call asking the to participate in the contest. The reason, MIG said, was that this was a revolutionary way to integrate MEMS with CMOS, but of course you can also integrate any other technology, like GaAS too. I think QP has a bright future in many sectorts--I just hope they've got their patents in order since it would be very easy to copy them with just a new changes to slip part patents that are not well written :(

Anand.Yaligar
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Re: cool and amazing applications
Anand.Yaligar   11/30/2014 6:30:59 AM
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@wilber: Although those things are really interesting techs, they lose flexibility in the face of the basic building blocks of technology like quilted packages. Such things have a wide range of uses.

Anand.Yaligar
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Re: cool and amazing applications
Anand.Yaligar   11/30/2014 6:28:26 AM
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" I agree. The reason the quilted package won, I believe, is that its a chip-making technology that could be used in any of the other end user products."

@wilbur: Exactly. The usability of quilt packaging in various other sectors is tremendous. Just think about the power dissipational abilities of such a chip design. This can be the long term solution for IOT devices that need low processing power but that must last long.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Modular Construction of an Integrated Circuit
R_Colin_Johnson   11/28/2014 4:06:00 PM
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DrQuine: that's a good way of looking at it. Others area trying to overcome all the problems of integrating different processes technologies--like GaAs--atop silicon chips, but this every cool concept sidesteps all those problems.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: cool and amazing applications
R_Colin_Johnson   11/28/2014 4:01:45 PM
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Wilbur_xbox: I agree. The reason the quilted package won, I believe, is that its a chip-making technology that could be used in any of the other end user products. Regarding dentistry, they are on the bleeding edge--they already do static 3-D scans of you teeth's position automatically, and this new dynamic measuing technology will help with all the maladies that involve teeth-in-motion.

DrQuine
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Modular Construction of an Integrated Circuit
DrQuine   11/28/2014 2:52:27 PM
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The winning concept has combined two apparently contradictory objectives: "Modular Construction" (mix and match) and an "Integrated Circuit". Tbhis would seem to have a lot of potential for the development of new products which are comprised of standard building blocks. 

wilber_xbox
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cool and amazing applications
wilber_xbox   11/28/2014 5:57:32 AM
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I really like the one for dentists and for sportsman. These may not have won the prize but shows how we are integrating more and more technology in daily life and improving the quality of life for all of us.

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