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Pitfalls in Internet of Things for 2015 & Beyond

12/23/2014 01:12 PM EST
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sixscrews
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The Circle - in reality
sixscrews   1/4/2015 6:23:56 PM
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The Dave Eggers novel 'The Circle,' published in 2013, gave many of us an excellent insight into the IoT - and it scared the be-jezzus out of me.  Of course, it didn't stop me posting on EE Times and other sites.  I'm too old to be terribly concerned about what happens in 40 years but 10 years - well, maybe that's something I might worry about - and the silly projections are just that, silly.

OK, 'The Circle' was a novel, maybe sort of Science Fiction (always suspect) but the main characters went 'Transparent' with devices that suspiciously resembled Google Glass or Cop Cameras or whatever - where does privacy go in this kind of world?

Seems ideal for the People's Republican MSS or Head-blown-up (as a bad joke) Kim's slave state but I'm not sure the US or the EU (whatever that is) will stand for it.  Or maybe they will - people are strange, as somebody said back in the '60s.

ss/wb

DougInRB
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Re: ...only as good as the weakest link
DougInRB   12/31/2014 1:20:20 PM
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Now that's something I would embrace.  I already have a micro version of that in my universal remote control.  It handles turning on the projector, lowering the screen, turning on the receiver and starting the Blu-Ray player with one click.  It is not connected to my WiFi, so it cannot be hacked.

If I were to build a house today, I'd have CAT 5 cable run everywhere in the house and have the internal 'collection of things' be completely disconnected from the outside world.  For the last couple of feet to my smart-toaster, I could use Bluetooth or some other short range wireless standard.  If anybody wanted to hack that, they would have to be on my property - allowing me to confront them with a shotgun :-).

 

 

wilber_xbox
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Re: some pitfalls might be easy?
wilber_xbox   12/31/2014 12:16:48 PM
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There are many hype words that are floating around after the smartphone slump - wearable devices, connected devices, IoT, Big Data, 3D printer etc. There is a lot to be learn to make each of them integrated in our lives. But one thing is sure that they will change they way we communicate or do thing today.

wilber_xbox
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Re: ...only as good as the weakest link
wilber_xbox   12/31/2014 12:14:01 PM
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I think we are concerned too much about the internet part but not much concerned about the connected things part. Internet is an obvious problematic area the way we know it but there are solutions that can be made for short range connection and not available for the whole world to connect to. I think we need to disconnect Internet from IoT and make it CoT (connection of things).

betajet
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Re: ...only as good as the weakest link
betajet   12/30/2014 9:51:44 AM
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Doug asked: I've never been a tinfoil hat type, but IoT may change that.  Am I being overly paranoid, or are these concerns legitimate?

IMO there are two kinds of computers: those that have no network connections whatsoever and hackable computers.  If there's a connection to outside -- no matter how small -- it will eventually be hacked.

My primary source for this is the Locked Room Mystery [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locked_room_mystery] in which the victim dies in a room locked from the inside, so it's impossible for it to have been murder.  However, it's always in fact a fiendishly clever murder which takes advantage of a hole -- often tiny.  My favorite author of this genre is John Dickson Carr.  A great example of a locked room murder gone wrong is Louis Malle's 1958 film Ascenseur pour l'échafaud (Elevator to the Gallows).

DougInRB
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...only as good as the weakest link
DougInRB   12/29/2014 1:18:49 PM
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I don't know the stats, but I suspect that a large percentage of folks who have their computers infected by malware had 'protection'.  Yet, all they have to do is open the door by clicking 'accept' (or whatever).

Protecting your automatic house will be no different.  Just let in that one cool, yet evil application and your house becomes vulnerable.  Evildoers will be able to know when you are not home and they will be able to turn off your intrusion protection before waltzing in to your home to party and plunder.  Maybe they are just mischevious and want to turn off your TV in the middle of the Superbowl.

Worse, maybe they are foreign governments/terrorists who want to cause significant economic damage when they infect millions of households.  An even worse scenario is when our own government tells us that they need to control our sprinklers, internal temperature, etc. - all in the name of 'the greater good'.

I've never been a tinfoil hat type, but IoT may change that.  Am I being overly paranoid, or are these concerns legitimate?

 

Roger3
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IOT GOLD RUSH
Roger3   12/25/2014 6:12:48 AM
Junko,

Very good text ( as usual ) !

You basically described the IOT Gold Rush !!!

Applications layers definitions, sensor fusion algorithms, security ( including privacy )
and RF are very key points in the "rush".

Taking your comment that "won´t be a one-size-fits-all MCU", I would say that won´t
be a one-size-fits-all RF solution. Apparently several technologies will ( actually are )
be living together in the big IOT puzzle. Interoperability will be puzzled !
But BLE, IEEE 802.15.4 and WiFi are in advantage in the "Rush".

Definitely smart card´s security is the model for IOT security, btw smart card is a
"thing" ! Secure element is a missing block in the IOT architecture.

For me the most important point of your text was the Google case. There will be no
gold at the end of the rush without creating "things" that has value !

 Rogerio/Brazil

Anand.Yaligar
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Re: ISDN
Anand.Yaligar   12/24/2014 8:21:42 AM
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@zeeglen: IOT is coming, that is for sure, and no, after all such preparations, the IOT bubble won't be bursting unless we cannot find proper technical management for the internet and for the things.

Anand.Yaligar
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Re: some pitfalls might be easy?
Anand.Yaligar   12/24/2014 8:20:19 AM
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@Alex: Having two standards would be enough. Right now we need to concentrate on the companies that are blindly jumping on the IOT bandwagon. Since there are a number of layers to the success of "50 billion connected devices by 2020" statement, we have to categorize IOT into Internet and Things. Managing the internet COMES FIRST. Why? Because we have to create a dwelling spot for vendors to test their IOT. The application security for the "thing" comes after we broaden the internet and also make it safer.

alex_m1
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some pitfalls might be easy?
alex_m1   12/23/2014 9:30:32 PM
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For the multi-RF issue , i think in the near future for most cases 2 standards could be enough, maybe something like wan(like LoRa) and bluetooth-mesh ? And at that point , integrating 2 modems is easier.

As for the "broader market" problem - it's not different from the general tradeoffs MCU companies usually face and they know how to manage that quite well - so i don't really get where the problem is.

 

 

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