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Fonts Could Set IoT Devices Apart

1/5/2015 11:35 AM EST
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SNORDQUIST662
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TrueType and OpenType WebFonts, eh?
SNORDQUIST662   3/10/2015 10:45:06 PM
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Since then Microsoft managed to do some OpenType contests and other championing, so for people who didn't want to go through pulldowns asking for one right answer among 785 options there's been a little break there. Not to say your first choice shouldn't be artisinal Gaelic fonts, removing the support tree that requires an engineer to come out and read blocky text because it's not the AMA font...okay, that won't be the case, but among the fonts the user loves...that's worth scheduling the ridiculous font choice Requirement.

Particular link: http://www.monotype.com/solutions/white-goods

David Ashton
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Monotype
David Ashton   1/10/2015 12:54:26 AM
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My only previous knowledge of monotype has been their Monotype Corsiva font that comes with most versions of Windows.  Very nice when you want something a bit fancy.  Seems they are still doing good work though.



DrQuine
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Universal Fonts for Devices
DrQuine   1/9/2015 6:40:28 PM
Steve Jobs' passion for fonts is legendary - and continues to this day as the latest version of the iPhone operating system included an upgrade to the fonts. I am puzzled, however, by the implication that good scalable fonts are a recent innovation.

"TrueType is an outline font standard developed by Apple and Microsoft in the late 1980s as a competitor to Adobe's Type 1 fonts used in PostScript. It has become the most common format for fonts on both the Mac OS and Microsoft Windows operating systems." (Wikipedia - Jan 9, 2015).

It has been decades since this idea became mainstream.

Some Guy
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Remember when 20 KB + 94 KB was a big deal?
Some Guy   1/6/2015 3:33:48 PM
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Just thinking about learning to program in 1980 on an IBM 360 with 64KB of RAM and a COBOL compiler written in 8K overlays. Now it's "throwaway" small for the Internet of Things and Wearables. A Cray in your pocket and an Amdahl on your wrist. Kinda puts the last few decades in perspective.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Steve Jobs at Reed College
junko.yoshida   1/6/2015 12:24:32 PM
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I agree. There are so many IoT devices on the show floor at CES this week; fonts are something neglected and yet they could make a HUGE difference!

 

goafrit
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Re: Steve Jobs at Reed College
goafrit   1/6/2015 7:47:03 AM
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Ergonomics is a big competitive weapon in todays electronics industry. Most of the components are commoditized. You win by aesthetics

Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: Steve Jobs at Reed College
Sheetal.Pandey   1/6/2015 7:42:56 AM
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Since IOT will touch almost everyday use electronics stuff in a household the display of local languages might become a necessity. Also the font size depending on user may be an elder person of child. So much to innovate.

krisi
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Re: Steve Jobs at Reed College
krisi   1/5/2015 2:50:08 PM
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I have exactly the same thoughts Rick...regardless, esthetics is important in consumer market...and most companies are not doing a good job with it

rick merritt
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Steve Jobs at Reed College
rick merritt   1/5/2015 1:07:05 PM
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This reminds me of stories of Steve Jobs taking a fonts course or something like that at Reed College and it being a big deal in his appreciation for the aesthetic of physical/industrial design. It feels at once both interesting, useful and a little over-rated.

rick merritt
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Steve Jobs at Reed College
rick merritt   1/5/2015 1:06:56 PM
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This reminds me of stories of Steve Jobs taking a fonts course or something like that at Reed College and it being a big deal in his appreciation for the aesthetic of physical/industrial design. It feels at once both interesting, useful and a little over-rated.

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