REGISTER | LOGIN
Breaking News
News & Analysis

Organics To Extend Moore's Law

SEMICON Europa touts tech beyond 7nm
10/7/2015 11:00 AM EDT
9 comments
NO RATINGS
More Related Links
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
traneus
User Rank
Author
molecular electronics
traneus   10/8/2015 3:02:37 PM
NO RATINGS
I recall Westinghouse using the term "molecular electronics" to describe their silicon integrated circuits in 1965.

docdivakar
User Rank
Author
Re: Nano-Organics Materials to Extend Moore's Law
docdivakar   10/8/2015 2:52:49 PM
NO RATINGS
@Jayna: you already made the point I was going to(!) to GroovyGeek and Colin: I too think the title of the article is some what arbitrary from today's perspective and the forseeable future. Organic electronics, and I mean this from the process perspective, is no where near where it needs to be in order to take advantage of nanotubes and molecular self-assembly, etc. From that angle, it is not at all an extension of Moore's law but a complement to it.

I think Colin's article is trying to make a point here -that the future of electronics hardware technologies has plenty of opportunities for new technology innovation irrespective of transistor scaling. To that end, what I find interesting that EU seems to be investing more than other geo locations as a percentage of GDP on Organics.

MP Divakar

Jayna Sheats
User Rank
Author
Re: Nano-Organics Materials to Extend Moore's Law
Jayna Sheats   10/8/2015 1:00:42 PM
NO RATINGS
The very headline seemed such an oxymoron (typical organic electronics being disconnected from Moore's Law by printing resolution limits) that I just had to read this...  The concept lurking in the background seems to be "molecular electronics", which if realizable would certainly allow some sort of dramatic scaling, and associated computing power.  But I think it has become clear that individual organic molecules are not stable enough to fit the paradigm of solid state electronics. 

Molecular electronics can work only if the molecules are regularly replaced, which nature has worked out how to do.  We know a lot about self-assembly (how to tailor the chemistry to get certain macromolecular structures), but we are a long ways from being able to duplicate what evolution has done to allow repair and regrowth of them.  I think their vision is fine, but realization is decades into the future.

And yes, Colin, I think Moore's Law is all about business, not technology.  Just as when people say that 3D is going to "extend Moore's Law": another oxymoron - it does no such thing.  But it can generate new business for someone.  It would be nice if people were more honest about that!

R_Colin_Johnson
User Rank
Author
Re: Nano-Organics Materials to Extend Moore's Law
R_Colin_Johnson   10/8/2015 12:13:15 PM
NO RATINGS
GroovyGeek: Good point about Kroemer's Lemma. Another thing to consider is "why" do we need to continue extending Moore's Law. Is it mostly business reasons? We survived the end of the clock cranking at <5GHz. New more inventive software could keep the customers buying, even if the hardware doen't continue to shrink, but everybody thinks the world will fall apart if Moore's Law ends. What do you think?

GroovyGeek
User Rank
Author
Re: Nano-Organics Materials to Extend Moore's Law
GroovyGeek   10/8/2015 1:58:41 AM
NO RATINGS
Sigh, looking to replace silicon again. Perhaps it is time to remind people of Kroemer's Lemma: The principal applications of any sufficiently new and innovative technology always have been—and will continue to be—applications created by that technology.

rohitvora
User Rank
Rookie
Nano-Organics Materials to Extend Moore's Law
rohitvora   10/7/2015 7:17:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Wednesday, October 7th 2015. Hello Dr Johnson. An interesting article. And equally interesting comment(s) by Dr. Les_Slater and you.

Even though Dr Gordon Moor conceded a few years back the sustainability of Moor's Law beyond 2016-17, Yes, it is now possible to extend through nanotecnology. However arranging Organic Semiconductors at the nano-scale in complex ordered-structures/morphologies yet formation of its flexible film form at the commercial production scale will be a challenge to overcome.

One of the way is to look into synthesizing novel Graphene-embedded organic liquid-crystalline type tunable semiconductor polymers (polyimides, etc.), and use in flexible 3D electronic device fabrication. As a high-performance and low-k polymers research scientist, I am looking forward to reading further on the research work and data analysis on this exciting subject.

I sincerely would appreciate if you would, please do e-mail your latest technical artical publications on this R&D work to me at my e-mail ID: rohitvora@apr-tecnologies.com . Thanking you in advance.

Les_Slater
User Rank
Author
Re: How are these devices to be structured?
Les_Slater   10/7/2015 4:42:14 PM
NO RATINGS
RCJ,

Like the subjects you cover. Got lots of interest in all the fields you mention and look forward to your slideshow. There's undoubtedly many milestones and hard work ahead before the full fruition of organic's potential.

The biggest puzzle, at least for me, is how complex, and to some degree arbitrary, topology can be directed to assemble as desired.

Les

R_Colin_Johnson
User Rank
Author
Re: How are these devices to be structured?
R_Colin_Johnson   10/7/2015 4:08:55 PM
NO RATINGS
In a nutshell, these 300 scientists in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, computer science and electrical engineering think they augment, complement and ultimtely replace coneventional CMOS, with crystalline organic FETs with ultra-low power (.1-to-.4 volts on) and molecular scale sizes. How they get there has to do with chemical signals, and adaptie algorithms that minimize energy consumption to a level near the human brain (50 watts. There are lots of challenges ahead down that road, but I have a slideshow I'm working on that will show all the milestones alonge the way. And keep those smart questions coming. I alway appreciate your comments, Les.

Les_Slater
User Rank
Author
How are these devices to be structured?
Les_Slater   10/7/2015 2:19:17 PM
NO RATINGS
The talk is of organics waiting in the wings to take up after silicon maxes out at 7nm but it's not clear what they're exactly in what ways.

Ordered structures and energy efficiencies are laudable techniques and goals but there does not seem to be any specific discussion on area or volumetric density. Feature size getting below 7nm is just part of the problem. Patterning and interconnect will determine functional capabilities. One limitation with silicon is lithography. Organics may imply self-assembly but how is this to be directed to get the requisite functionality?

What does it mean to surpass silicon at 7nm? Are we talking about some computational, energy per function, volumetric density surpassing silicon? 

Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed