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IoT Networks Expand at MWC

Ingenu licenses 25 national networks
2/23/2016 02:00 AM EST
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Day808
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Re: LPWA regulation
Day808   2/25/2016 7:19:29 AM
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It's a fair point.  There are various unlicensed bands around the world described as ISM. Unlicensed doesn't mean unregulated though, and there are are some regional and country variations, such as limits on downlink power for example, imposed to ensure fair usage. 

These variations are usually trivial compared the band fragmentation in licensed cellular.

But it does mean that companies often have to go through an approvals process with the national or regional regulator before launching a service.

 

 

rick merritt
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Re: LPWA regulation
rick merritt   2/24/2016 5:47:15 PM
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@Aapo: I suspect Ingenu was referring to France, Spain, Germany and the UK where Sigfox, LoRa and others have already sewn up a lot of biz and "regulations" may have been a bt of a smokescreen.

rick merritt
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Re: Many players, one model
rick merritt   2/24/2016 5:45:02 PM
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Let's chat offline about Telensa sometime

AapoM
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LPWA regulation
AapoM   2/23/2016 7:09:52 PM
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I found the comment from Ingenu regarding Europe and "regulation" very interesting, given that Ingenu and MeterLinq already have a public RPMA network in Italy. I'm assuming that regulation in this context refers primarily to ETSI's playbook for unlicensed spectrum. Maybe launching in Italy was an opportunistic move, with a solid anchor tenant (Amgas) and the absence of competition outweighing any regulatory concerns.

Worldwide, the regulations for the ISM bands - as well as their enforcement - appears to come with rather many flavours. FCC and ETSI are relatively clear-cut, but I've heard from a couple of different suppliers that especially many emerging markets can be quite unpredictable for anyone who is mulling a market entry. Makes me think that the LPWA market will see a good deal of geographical fragmentation in terms of what technologies will see adoption, and where.

Day808
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Re: Many players, one model
Day808   2/23/2016 11:57:46 AM
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I agree with your assesment Rick, and there is little doubt that some IoT operators will thrive.

I'm with Telensa, and I think we are proof that a city-centric business model can work too.

A use case that is pretty universal (which also has the great momentum of LED conversion behind it) is the wireless control of street lighting. The city buys the controls system because it quickly pays for itself in energy and maintenance savings, with the bonus of getting its own LPWA network.

One million streetlights later, we can attest that this is business model that works. Cities move surprisingly quickly when they are not burning tax-payers money, enabling sensors and monetising applications, and being proctive in joining-up other local organisations, such as healthcare and transportation. This last part is in its infancy, but looks very promising indeed.

 

 

rick merritt
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Re: Many players, one model
rick merritt   2/23/2016 11:12:51 AM
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@Day808 I'd like to hear more about who is behind these smart city biz models.

I've seen a lot of enbergy behind smart cities but I think its a tough road for a vendor to scale a busienss around a bazillion unique customers many of them bureaucratic city governments.

BTW I think Sigfox wants to be an operator, but Ingenu seems to be taking a hybrid model of operator/licensor in different geos which LoRa is more of a licensor/arms supplier.

Day808
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Many players, one model
Day808   2/23/2016 4:25:47 AM
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Interesting that the LPWA players are trying to replicate the conventional operator model. It's a high risk srategy for LPWA vendors - whereas for conventinal operators IoT is a tiny fraction of their business. Operators have the opposite problem - they will have to make long term service level commitments (typical IoT lifecycle 15 years) on a marginal business line.

There is another model emerging.  The business case for smart city applications is city-wide, not nationwide, with service ecosystems connecting and automating between local organisations and infrastructure.  It points to different network thinking: local coverage, local cost and service control, local service innovation.

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