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13 Women Who Changed Science

Celebrating historic women in tech, engineering
3/1/2016 11:15 AM EST
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antedeluvian
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Caroline Herschel
antedeluvian   3/8/2016 3:47:19 AM
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Might I suggest adding Caroline Herschel (William Herscel's sister, but an astronomer in her own right) to the list.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_Herschel

 

elizabethsimon
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Re: How did they miss Marie Curie?
elizabethsimon   3/7/2016 12:24:24 PM
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I agree that the emphasis in the article was more on women in engineering but the title suggests otherwise. The title also suggests thet the article would be about prominant women in science.


That being said, I really like your suggestion of Emmy Noether. I had to look her up. Very impressive accomplishments and deserves to be more widely known

mrdc1203
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Re: How did they miss Marie Curie?
mrdc1203   3/6/2016 10:19:21 PM
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The emphasis in this articule is much more on women in engineerining than in science.  While Marie Curie is well known, and unlike most of the outstanding female contributors to science, got her Nobel prizes, how about some of the less known but equally deserving women?  A prime example in my mind would be Emmy Noether, whose contributions to mathematics and theoretical physics are central to modern understanding of physical symmetries and conservation laws.

elizabethsimon
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Re: How did they miss Marie Curie?
elizabethsimon   3/3/2016 11:37:08 AM
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In my upper division EE classes, I was usually the only woman in the clsss. The lack of role models didn't deter me and I've had a satisfying carrier on the whole. But then I've never been a girly girl so maybe that has something to do with it.

I've noticed that most women interested in math and science tend to go toward biology / health sciences. It might be worth some study to find out what it is about EE that appears to have a neagitive appeal to half the population.

Bert22306
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Re: How did they miss Marie Curie?
Bert22306   3/2/2016 7:42:29 PM
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Yeah, I was actually typing that same question, when you beat me to the punch.

Not being female, I have a hard time understanding why such a big deal needs to be made about women in science, frankly. Don't know if my case is unusual, but we had any number of women as science and math teachers in grade school on through high school. Including a truly excellent physics teacher and another truly excellent calculus teacher, in high school. So I never understood the bit about role models. (And, of course, everyone must know about Marie Curie, if no one else.)

So my perspective is entirely different. It is that in spite of the fact that women are represented in science and math, girls in school soon lose interest. Although there were women in our engineering class in college, there were none in EE per se.

Lucky for me, my daughter showed no sign of intimidation, or worry about role models, and pursued her interests in science and math all the way through a doctorate and beyond. Although full disclosure, in veterinary medicine, a field now (recently) dominated by women, who apparently also never felt intimidated by science and math.

Jessica Lipsky
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Re: How did they miss Marie Curie?
Jessica Lipsky   3/2/2016 7:17:34 PM
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I was aiming for lesser-known women of science.

elizabethsimon
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How did they miss Marie Curie?
elizabethsimon   3/2/2016 7:10:55 PM
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The first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the only person to win twice in multiple sciences (Physics and Chemistry)

 

Jessica Lipsky
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Re: next month is ...
Jessica Lipsky   3/2/2016 3:11:11 PM
Right on Rick. 

Regardless of how you raise your children (devoid of ideology or political correctness), they have to exist in a world of social mores that favor a particular kind of person. I grew up with supportive parents but no knowledge of female scientists -- I wish I had those images!

rick merritt
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Re: next month is ...
rick merritt   3/2/2016 1:02:40 PM
@HardwIntr Thanks for being a good parent!

In my opinion, stories like this aren't about being politically correct. They are about taking the time and energy to celebrate human beings who for generations have been repressed by racism and sexism which are, in my opinion, ideologies born out of fear and ignorance.

I believe there is a lot of good work yet to be done untying these old knots from our social tapestry. I invite you to join in that work in whatever way feels right to you, even if it is just watching the parade pass by.

 

HardwIntr
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next month is ...
HardwIntr   3/2/2016 4:05:04 AM
You kow, next month is the 'black transgender month' ; i'm eagerly waiting for an article on how they too "changed" (no less) science !


All that strange because at the same time we are told ad nauseum that there's no such thing as gender or race ...


From someone who's proud to have grown 3 engineers, including a girl, and all that without an ounce of ideology or political correctness.
Cheers

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