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Graphene Boosts Battery Electrodes

Deformation Increases Conductivity 400X
3/25/2016 07:40 AM EDT
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R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Shrinky Dinks
R_Colin_Johnson   3/29/2016 7:06:14 AM
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Yes, believe it or not, they actually used "professional" Shrinky Dinks to perform the research, in addition to all their high-tech workbench tools :)

tb100
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Shrinky Dinks
tb100   3/28/2016 10:04:53 PM
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When you mentioned "Wrinkles and crumples, introduced by placing graphene on shrinky polymers" it made me think of Shrinky Dinks:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrinky_Dinks

It says that in addition to the toys, they do make professional shrinking sheets.  I used to play with Shrinky Dinks as a kid.

 

 

tb100
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Re: Origami
tb100   3/28/2016 9:49:42 PM
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Corrected: a renowned Origami artist and physicist gave a talk at Brown:

https://claralieu.wordpress.com/2015/11/18/robert-j-lang-lecture-at-brown-university/

Sounds like some collaboration is in order.

DMcCunney
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Re: Origami
DMcCunney   3/27/2016 1:13:23 PM
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I doubt he'd be interested.  Origami is a hobby.  He does other things for a living.  And the referenced outfit isn't working on teledildonics in any case. :-)

>Dennis

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Origami
R_Colin_Johnson   3/27/2016 12:25:52 PM
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I was going to say you should recommend him working with these researchers until you mentioned the sexual part, to which I have no comment.

DMcCunney
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Re: Origami
DMcCunney   3/26/2016 4:47:44 PM
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R_Colin_Johnson: you get the impression that they need an origami expert. But which they are all Americans--despite their Asian sounding names--I doubt that they have.

All origami experts aren't Asians.  An old friend named Mark is an American origamist, who is an invited guest at Japanese origami conventions.  He has attained sufficient mastery of his craft, and is a big name in origami circles.


(He told a story back when about creating an origami penis.  Someone he showed it to said "It should get longer whgen you stroke it!"  He realized that was correct, thought about it, and made a change in his folds so that his origami penis did get longer when stroked. He was later introduced to another origamist, and the introducer said "Hey, Mark!  Show him your prick!"  Mark pulled the origami penis from his briefcase.  The other origamist produced another origami penis that got longer when stroked, based on a completely different set of folds. Some ideas strike more than once...)

>Dennis

R_Colin_Johnson
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Re: Origami
R_Colin_Johnson   3/26/2016 3:32:42 PM
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If you look at their taxonomy of folding and crumbling steps you get the impression that they need an origami expert. But which they are all Americans--despite their Asian sounding names--I doubt that they have. But it's a great idea, so hopefully they will take to heart your suggest! Thanks for the comment.

perl_geek
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Origami
perl_geek   3/26/2016 2:14:09 PM
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I wonder if they've had any advice from an origami specialist on the best way to fold the materials for the desired properties?

R_Colin_Johnson
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Higher Current Density Too
R_Colin_Johnson   3/25/2016 11:52:07 AM
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One thing I forgot to put in the story came from Brown professor Ian Wong:

"Ideally, electrochemical electrodes should display high surface areas, but also permit efficient electrolyte transport to the liquid/solid interface. Our repeated crumpling permits large areas of graphene

oxide to be contained within a much smaller area (1/40 of their original dimension) after three-time compression, which we show enhances electrochemical current densities by 2000% graphene.

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