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U.S Withdraws Apple Case

Enforcement vs. privacy debate continues
3/28/2016 08:45 PM EDT
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Kevin Neilson
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Re: Has it really been cracked?
Kevin Neilson   3/29/2016 6:05:37 PM
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The idea I read goes something like this, though I'm not certain it's possible:

1. Copy the flash over to the backup flash

2. attempt the next 10 passcodes

3. The phone clears out the flash if you guess incorrectly

4. copy backup flash back to iPhone flash

5. go to step 2

It seems like this assumes that the counter holding the number of failed attempts is stored in the flash.  Rewriting the flash sounds like a big pain, unless you can do it through a serial (JTAG?) interface.

If there is a 4-digit passcode, there are only 1e4 possible passcodes, but the passcode is combined with a unique ID in the hardware, so you can't try passcodes in parallel on  different hardware setups.

 

eewhiz60
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There are other precedents already established
eewhiz60   3/29/2016 5:46:58 PM
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How many court cases have you seen where private SMS text messages were used in law enforcement, guess what Verizon/ATT/Sprint/etc handed that information to the authorities... it's no differnet in the Apple case

Remember when Gmail (which culls through sent/received images) reported a child pornographer that was sending illegal images via Gmail, and they handed over the perp to the FBI... those were private right??

When any of the above had occurred, I didn't hear any outrage over Privacy rights etc (well maybe a little over the Gmail thing)

Actually if you look at the fine print in your Cellular contract, the Gmail terms of use... it says that no illegal activity can be used with their services, otherwise it will be exposed.  It seems like Apple could amend its Terms of Use: "If you use your iPhone for shooting or blowing people up, your phone and it's information will be exposed"

My two cents worth....

rick merritt
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Re: Has it really been cracked?
rick merritt   3/29/2016 4:06:13 PM
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@ no_longer_an_engineer

From what I have learned from past reporting on the story and engineers comments here, there are many pathways to access the data without breaking the password-based encryption to get access to the phone

no_longer_an_engineer
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Has it really been cracked?
no_longer_an_engineer   3/29/2016 1:43:54 PM
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Everyone has been taking what the FBI has been saying as gospel truth, but who knows for sure? What I would like to know is whether or not the encryption has really been cracked, or at least get some expert opinion on the likelihood that it has been cracked.

MeasurementBlues
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Technical discussion of how it might have been cracked
MeasurementBlues   3/29/2016 8:09:10 AM
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See Could test and measurement crack Farook's iPhone? by Larry Desjardin on EDN.

 

rick merritt
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Re: Expert help ?!
rick merritt   3/29/2016 12:19:04 AM
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Yes, Cellebrite. Good point. I'll try to call them tomorrow

Tim R Johnson
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Compensation for software
Tim R Johnson   3/28/2016 10:39:42 PM
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There is another issue that has not been considered, compensation for software. If the data was already in Apple's records, or was accessable using an existing utility, the only issues would be privacy issues. But the way I understand it, to access the data Apple would need to write custom software to do so. The DOD can't contact Boeing and say we have a compeling national security need for a fleet of new tanker aircraft, so design a new tanker, build us enough to outfit a new tanker wing, and oh yes, do it for free because national security is involved. Why should software be any different? If new software is needed to extract the data, the goverment needs to sign a contract with Apple to develop the software and pay for it's development.

realjjj
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What's next?
realjjj   3/28/2016 10:30:10 PM
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The data on a device is just the data the owner of the device stores on it, knowingly or not. If the owner is smart enough to not store anything compromising , you get nothing.

Another scenario is 24/7 monitoring and you can't do that without banning encryption and any possible way for criminals to get encryption working on a device (LOL). But if you already have good enough of a reason to get a warrant to monitor that person's phone, you can use any other means of surveillance instead. If the real goal is mass surveillance, then the FBI are the criminals and the national threat.

In catching competent criminals, access would not help.

What does access give them and what does access give them over other tools at their disposal? Secure CCTV and in each home  and wearable trackers on each person would be far less damaging that what the FBI wants here. And that's not really a joke , 0 privacy would be less of a problem than 0 privacy and poor security coupled with the end of the US tech sector.

sranje
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Expert help ?!
sranje   3/28/2016 9:41:00 PM
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It was reported that assistance came from Israeli experts....  Has that been verified yet?

rick merritt
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What's next?
rick merritt   3/28/2016 9:03:41 PM
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I'd welcome thoughtful ideas about how to resolve the thorny issues here.

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