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Google Glass Lives On In Medicine

7/8/2016 11:15 AM EDT
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Samuel J.
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Doubtful
Samuel J.   10/30/2016 7:06:09 PM
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I doubt it's a good idea. They really need to do a lot of test since it's a sensitive area.

perl_geek
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Re: image resolution
perl_geek   9/20/2016 2:57:11 PM
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I suspect that most of what an ER medic does would be facilitated by having 3 hands, not tying up one of the available pair waving a tablet around.

There's also the fact that medicine, especially emergencies, tends to involve a lot of bodily fluids of various kinds, all over the scenery. Anything that can't be hosed down easily is guaranteed to be a vector of infection.

There are some plausible roles for tablets in other areas, mostly as input devices of various kinds. (E.g. successive photographs might be a better progress file than a collection of written reports.) Avoiding use of human beings as expensive and unreliable data transducers should be part of systems design.

elizabethsimon
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Re: image resolution
elizabethsimon   7/11/2016 3:02:33 PM
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@cd2012 Why not just carry a tablet?

I imagine that the ER physican is performing tests while consulting with the specialist, some of which may require the use of both hands. I also think that the Google Glass interface is likely to be much more intuitive and less obtrusive for the ER physican than a tablet.

 

cd2012
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image resolution
cd2012   7/11/2016 1:32:59 PM
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Is the image resolution on Google Glass good enough for making medical decisions?  I've never tried it, so I'm genuinely curious.  Why not just carry a tablet?  I could see using it for purposes, like say surgery, where one's hands are already occupied or too bloody to engage with a tablet.

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