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PC Sales Raise Intel’s Q2

Outlook brightens as most groups grow
7/27/2017 07:01 PM EDT
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DWilde10
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Re: FPGAs: No worries
DWilde10   7/28/2017 6:47:06 PM
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I used to work in Intel's IOTG, and there industrial controls longevity is a very well understood concern.

elizabethsimon
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Re: FPGAs: No worries
elizabethsimon   7/28/2017 6:42:22 PM
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@DWilde - I understand that you work in a different group and have no direct knowlege. My comment was just to show how the uncertainty about Intel's plans for Altera leads to reduced sales in my industry.

Unfortunately, Intel's parts tend to be discontinued at a much higher rate than is desirable for industrial control customers. Since Intel bought Altera, there is a fear that their parts may meet similar fates.

 

DWilde10
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Re: FPGAs: No worries
DWilde10   7/28/2017 4:02:15 PM
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@elizabethsimon - Please, as I said, I work in a completely different group. I have no idea what Altera has in mind. I do know that Intel _is_ adding FPGA components to other products and we are also starting to use a multi-module package called EPID that allows us to mix and match much more flexibly. Also remember that the people who used to run Altera still are running it.

I was speaking off the cuff with no specific knowledge of any of this.

realjjj
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Re: ...
realjjj   7/28/2017 2:10:16 PM
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2-3 times less than that, including XPoint.

elizabethsimon
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Re: FPGAs: No worries
elizabethsimon   7/28/2017 1:17:52 PM
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@DWilde   I think the Altera acquisition was more for integration of other properties with Intel CPUs as it was for merchant silicon sales.

And that is the perception among those of us who use FPGAs which contributes to the decline in sales. The company I work for uses FPGAs in production units (not just prototype). We build products for the industrial market where there is not sufficient volume to justify an ASIC. We also prefer suppliers who have long product lifetimes (10 years or more).

If Intel's attitude is that 1K and 10K quantities are low volume then I'm guessing that we won't be getting the support that we got from Altera and will be shifting to other suppliers for new designs. If this is the case, it's too bad because I really like some of the Altera products.

Gondalf
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Re: ...
Gondalf   7/28/2017 12:38:21 PM
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I think we must to wait Intel will refresh all its SDD line to have higher memory revenue results and this will happen in the 2H 2017. Moreover Intel is doubling its Dalian capacity with a copy exactly expansion of actual building. IMO a revenue in the range of $2-2.5B/quarter will be a feasible possibility at the middle of 2019. I have not opinion about 3DXP, but i think it will be a boutique technology for datacenters only for many years, still if 3DXP will succeed in datacenter Intel  will be fairly happy of this tricky momory.

We'll see :)

DWilde10
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Re: FPGAs: No worries
DWilde10   7/28/2017 12:01:06 PM
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Disclosure: I work for another Intel group

I think the Altera acquisition was more for integration of other properties with Intel CPUs as it was for merchant silicon sales. Altera's standalone FPGA business (and Xilinx's, for that matter) were tiny and piece-by-piece for prototyping, but there is much more potential out there in merging the technology with other IP. That's where the volume is

rick merritt
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FPGAs: No worries
rick merritt   7/28/2017 11:16:31 AM
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In a research note Ross Seymore of Deutche Bank (quoted below) suggests Intel's FPGA shortfall will be a single-quarter blip:

"On a segment basis, PSG revs declined -5% y/y (comms/concentrated data center customer weakness), vs. its primary competitor [i.e. Xilinx] +7% y/y. Once again, we note that the co reiterated their full year PSG guide of up mid-single digits, thereby closing that gap on an annual basis."

rick merritt
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Re: Strategy issue
rick merritt   7/28/2017 11:14:48 AM
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My big takeaway here is that 3DXP is just proving not nearly as interesting as we thought a couple years ago probably do to a combination of being harder to make and less stunningly impressive vis-a-vis 3D NAND. But BK still seems to believe in it.

realjjj
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Re: Strategy issue
realjjj   7/28/2017 10:38:16 AM
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Would assume that statement is more about how XPoint ramps from very little and not about shifting capacity any further.

XPoint is at Lehi and likely NAND at Dalian was about accommodating both the XPoint and the 3D NAND transitions, they needed it to keep NAND bit growth going and not lose share.

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