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11 Views of Vintage Microcomputers

40-year-old pre-PC era systems are still ticking
8/9/2017 06:00 AM EDT
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lbarrows
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Thanks for visiting our booth!
lbarrows   8/13/2017 3:18:13 PM
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I was one of the guys in the Apple booth, thank you for stopping by! That's actually my IIe you have a photo of. The game being played (Alien Downpour) was released this year by Michael Packard in celebration of 40 years of the Apple II.

Michael Packard
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Alien Downpour
Michael Packard   8/13/2017 2:37:51 PM
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Hi.  The apple //e in the photo is playing my game, Alien Downpour, which was released in May of THIS YEAR for the Apple ][ Family of computers.  It runs an ony 48k Apple ][ including the original 1977 Apple ][, the Apple ][plus, the Apple //e, Apple //c, Apple IIGS, and the Apple /// in Compatibility mode.  The game can be purchased on 5.25" floppy or cassette from www.BeRighteous.com

 

HankWalker
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Re: a few details
HankWalker   8/11/2017 7:13:35 AM
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The chips were made in 6, 5 and then 4 micron depletion mode NMOS. The 4 micron was licensed from Intel's HMOS process and then tweaked. Manufacturing was done at DEC and Harris Semiconductor. My recollection was the first CMOS was 2 micron.

TanjB
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Re: a few details
TanjB   8/11/2017 12:08:34 AM
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Thanks for the details.  I was not aware they used LSI for some of the "minis" of the late 70s, early 80s.  The ones which were publicised as microcomputers that I remember were later single chips.  I just assumed the PDPs were built with bitslice (like the AMD29xx series) to get the kinds of speeds expected.

What was the process for F-11, NMOS or something faster?

Kevin Krewell
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Re: a few details
Kevin Krewell   8/9/2017 8:13:26 PM
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Thanks for PDP11/LSI-11 backstory!

David Ashton
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Re: a few details
David Ashton   8/9/2017 3:44:55 PM
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@Kevin, @Antedeluvian....you're probably thinking of the old Compaq "luggable", very similar in appearance to the Osborne (I don't think it has a "u") but it was IBM compatible. It featured in one of my stories here

http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=30&doc_id=1285085

 

Kevin Krewell
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Re: a few details
Kevin Krewell   8/9/2017 3:25:10 PM
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Whoops. My mistake. You are correct. It was a CP/M machine. It predated the IBM PC. 

antedeluvian
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Re: a few details
antedeluvian   8/9/2017 3:06:24 PM
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Kevin

"the Osborne was the first IBM PC compatible tranportable"

Let me be the first to point out that the Osborne 1 was not PC compatible. It was a CP/M machine.

Kevin Krewell
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Re: Living Computer Museum
Kevin Krewell   8/9/2017 2:38:42 PM
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Thanks for the tip  Mike. BTW, I believe the Vintage Computer Festival uses that venue for the Northwest edition of the festival.

MikePDX
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Living Computer Museum
MikePDX   8/9/2017 2:36:03 PM
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When in Seattle, be sure to check out Paul Allen's Living Computer Museum, just up the street from Safeco Field. You'll see one of everything, every Apple, IMSAI, Sol, Altair, North Star, Commodore, Radio Shack, Cromemco, Exidy, Atari, IBM, Osborne, Kaypro, Compaq, DEC, Sun, ..... They are all working and visitors are welcome to try them out. Lots of mainframes (CDC 6600, IBM 360) and minicomputers (PDP-11, Nova, VAX 11/780) too. Lots of fun.

http://www.livingcomputers.org/Discover/At-The-Museum/VintageComputers.aspx

  --Mike

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