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Infineon: Breaking Down Automotive Attacks
7/15/2013

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Infineon anticipates different types of automotive security attacks
Infineon anticipates different types of automotive security attacks

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junko.yoshida
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Re: Hackers and Car Controls at Black Hat / Defcon conference in Las Vegas
junko.yoshida   8/6/2013 2:13:14 PM
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Thanks. Yes, I am aware of it, and I am on it. From what I understand, these two "hackers" managed to take over the control of Prius with a laptop and a gamepad. The inspiration of their hacking also comes from the original tech paper -- Univ. of Washington, etc. -- mentioned in this story.

Stay tuned.

DrQuine
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CEO
Hackers and Car Controls at Black Hat / Defcon conference in Las Vegas
DrQuine   8/4/2013 10:31:14 PM
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I caught a passing news clip as I passed through the Atlanta airport this evening suggesting that hackers at the Black Hat / Defcon conference in Las Vegas did demonstrate ways to take over critical car controls. Are details forthcoming from EETimes? 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Don't knock university reports
Max The Magnificent   7/23/2013 1:52:11 PM
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Would this be a good time to mention my book review of Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson?

bgosheton
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Rookie
Re: Don't knock university reports
bgosheton   7/23/2013 9:43:18 AM
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Should be call that network Skynet?

David.Proffer
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Re: Will auto companies wait until a catastrophe happens?
David.Proffer   7/23/2013 3:55:14 AM
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Junko,

Every article, interview (and many of the engineer user comments on them) you have done in the last month has me more and more concerned about the direction auto control systems (and for that matter every single control system that is quickly moving to a networked, software primary controlled with some old school electronics stuff to keep those hardware folks quiet) architectures are going.

To your quandary at the end of your article and comment, yes it is shameful and to throw down a gauntlet perhaps criminal that more is not being done to create architectures that will minimize the possibilities of problems all the way up to catastrophes.

What concerns me in this article are two things, first this not unique to this gentleman's opinion of 'if I have not seen it, it is never happened':

"At this moment, no tragic automotive accident caused by external attacks has happened yet, he explained." quote from your article by I believe Martin Klimke.

And second, the believe by hardware security people that installing code execution systems that will only run vetted software will 'solve' the hackability of the macro-system.

I am not an expert in any way on TPM, but what I do know is I have owned computers and notebooks that have contained these TPM modules for as I remember at least 15 years and have patched the BIOS, firmware and Windows OS on what seems like a daily basis to address active exploits that none of which to my memory overrode the TPM security but disabled the functions of the computer or extracted data from the computer. So explain to me what TPM did to solve this? And how these similar modules will better protect vehicle systems with them?

 

DrQuine
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CEO
Can a $25 gadget let hackers seize control of a car?
DrQuine   7/21/2013 9:45:23 AM
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A July 17th New Scientist article "$25 gadget lets hackers seize control of a car" (http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21929266.500-25-gadget-lets-hackers-seize-control-of-a-car.html#.UevjztI3t8E) claims that an inexpensive device can be used to remotely seize control of some critical car controls. The device is scheduled to be shown at the Black Hat Security conference in Las Vegas on July 27th. It will be interesting to see what unfolds.

junko.yoshida
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Blogger
Re: Don't knock university reports
junko.yoshida   7/19/2013 9:10:56 AM
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DrQuine, I am hearing that some US auto makers are becoming increasingly aware of the issue Maybe someone must be doing a better job at articulating the issues.

Read the follow-up article -- this time on Freescale here:

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1318967&

Tom Murphy
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Re: Don't knock university reports
Tom Murphy   7/18/2013 9:17:26 PM
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DrQuine:  The notion that auto companies would become involved in solving problems seems awfully far-fetched to me on a day when the city of Detroit was forced to declare bankruptcy. Who's to blame for that?  Well, if the auto industry had acted far sooner to build better cars, it would have held onto its historic market share. But no. SUVs and trucks had higher profit margins, so that's the way it went.  And a once-proud city was brought to its knees.

junko.yoshida
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Blogger
Re: Don't knock university reports
junko.yoshida   7/17/2013 11:56:27 AM
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Exactly. And this is only the beginning. Wait until our cars start talking to other cars (vehicle to vehicle) and and our cars communicate with infrastructure (vehicle to Infrastrubure). 

elctrnx_lyf
User Rank
Manager
Re: Don't knock university reports
elctrnx_lyf   7/17/2013 8:47:17 AM
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The automotive companies are looking for making the car more electronic till now. Wth electronics came software and lot of connectivity. Now the security has become a concern.

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