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Artificial Pancreas Dials Up Smartphones
7/1/2013

Trials will take data from a glucose sensor (1), send it to a monitor (2), and then to a smartphone (3), which will determine actions and send them to a pump (4).
Trials will take data from a glucose sensor (1), send it to a monitor (2), and then to a smartphone (3), which will determine actions and send them to a pump (4).

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Nick4980
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Re: Pumps are already controlled via bluetooth
Nick4980   7/1/2013 8:46:11 PM
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You're right and the pump helps me keep a tighter control on the glucose level, but I never would use it with a smart phone.  As it turns out, uploading the info on glucose levels and pump activity up to the cloud is possible, so the Dr can review.  But that log is rather limited & I have looked for an Android or Apple app that would let me log more complete info and send it up to the cloud, but no luck yet.

Sandy455
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Re: Pumps are already controlled via bluetooth
Sandy455   7/3/2013 5:13:40 AM
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Rick, I am also an insulin pump user with a wireless meter (though not CGM) and am optimistic that in the next few years we (or at least Europe) will have a closed-loop artificial pancreas that is sufficiently accurate and reliable. The Dexcom CGM (continuous glucose monitor) is already quite reliable. However, I am not as confident about the security of a smartphone or cloud-based system that could be hacked to deliver a dose. It must be absolutely secure before I'd use it.

Sandy455
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Re: Pumps are already controlled via bluetooth
Sandy455   7/3/2013 5:16:33 PM
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To answer Rick's question, all current integrated pumps and glucose meters will suggest a dose to be delivered manually. For example, the Omnipod wireless pump with its integrated meter will calculate a dose based on past insulin delivery and current glucose tests. The patient/user can then accept or change the dose and deliver it manually.

In addition, most if not all standalone insulin pumps that are not related to glucose meters will also suggest a dose if the user enters a current glucose level and/or amount of carbs to be eaten. 

So, what's missing from the current systems?

The answer is the safety of real-time glucose testing (continuous monitors) connected to automated insulin delivery and possibly automated glucagon delivery. Real-time systems can prevent dangerous hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) as well as promote more stable glucose values, improving quality of life. Ask any Type I diabetic or parent of a Type I child, and hypoglycemia is their number one concern.

Most current meters do not test blood continuously, so a test performed now will not predict a rising or dropping blood sugar. As a result, Type I diabetic with a normal glucose test of 105 may be rapidly dropping into hypoglycemia, which can result in unconsciousness and death. A real-time glucose monitor (CGM), such as Dexcom, can predict this decline in glucose and allow the patient to take glucose to return to normal.

But what about the automated system? Why is it needed?

 

A closed loop system including an insulin pump and continuous monitor could finetune a dose on a real-time basis, eliminating hypoglycemia entirely while preventing hyperglycemia. That is the goal of current trials, and a hope for millions of Type I diabetics like me.

staceyblark
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staceyblark   6/18/2014 6:46:56 AM
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I told my grandmother about the new technology breakthroughs regarding diabetes treatment and she told me a lot of her friends at Sumner County in-home personal care center would be interested in using such a system that connects the two devices and "automates the process of delivering insulin based on real-time readings". If the level of glucose will be controlled more tightly everybody will have to benefit from that because there will be less complications.

bryandodley
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healthy pancreas
bryandodley   8/7/2014 9:36:18 AM
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My aunt has diabetes and she is always very concerned about the glucose level in her blood, she would surely love having such a device that would automate the "process of delivering insulin based on real-time readings". Also she has been using http://www.belllifestyleproducts.ca/ products for a long time because they make her feel much better, guess the results would be amazing if someone would use such natural products in combination with the automatic insulin delivering device.

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