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Santhoff
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re: Goodbye, UWB; but we hardly knew you
Santhoff   5/27/2009 1:24:26 PM
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Teacher, Low power is the promise of UWB however WiMedia's implementation of UWB was by no means "Low Power" at 2 to 3 watts power consumption. (It takes a lot of power to operate those Giga Bits per second+ ADC's and DAC's along with the FEC and other baseband logic blocks) compared to some of the most recent WiFi chips at less than 300mW it's hard to claim WiMedia is "Low Power" with a straight face.

zei
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re: Goodbye, UWB; but we hardly knew you
zei   5/27/2009 8:03:25 AM
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Answering your question what problem UWB radio technology can solve? Here one important point: MB-OFDM UWB technology requires 5-10 times less energy per transmitted bit than WiFi. That means that portable devices equipped with UWB will have a much longer battery life time. If one uses UWB as a means to transfer big amounts of data to/from the device we talk about 5-10 times longer battery life time related to the same amount of data. This is a breakthrough for any portable device storing audio, picture and video data and exchanging such data with other devices in a convenient wireless way! This advantage increases with the amount of data carried around - which increasing constantly - just look on the amount of memory available in todays portable devices (16GByte+). This explains, why leading companies for wireless connection of portable devices bet on UWB radio technology and will continue to do so regardless, what rumors are spread in the press. One more answer concerning data rate: If you add the WXP protocol on top of the UWB radio technology it gives you about 250-280 Mbps real user level TROUGHPUT (out of the 480 Mbps PHY burst data rate)at IP level. Devices are qualified for mass production and thus would be ideal to complement todays living room / office IP based communications enabling such high data rates with cheap and SMALL (just one antenna, or two if you add diversity), which at the end consume only 20% or less of the energy compared to other radio technologies available in mass production.

Santhoff
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re: Goodbye, UWB; but we hardly knew you
Santhoff   5/21/2009 4:36:27 AM
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As the CTO of the oldest UWB company in the consumer electronics space I would like to point out that WiMedia's implementation of UWB failed, not UWB. UWB is a spectrum allocation not a specific implementation of the technology. Pulse-LINK's UWB technology does deliver on the promise of UWB with over 800 Mbps of application layer throughput delivered both wirelessly and over wire such as coax. We achieved this with a totally different architecture than WiMedia. Pulse-LINK's Cwave UWB solution is optimized to take advantage of the unique wide bandwidth characteristics of UWB. The solution attempted by WiMedia was based on fundamentally narrow band techniques that traded away almost all the reason one would do UWB to begin with.

hottechgirl
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re: Goodbye, UWB; but we hardly knew you
hottechgirl   5/20/2009 6:05:42 AM
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OK, so this article hit the nail on the head, but is completely missing one important point - Wireless USB is based on UWB! Wireless USB is a simple extension to USB technology. The protocol and topology is completely re-used, so the billions of dollars of infrastructure investment is preserved. Wi-Fi and 60GHz do not have any of this infrastructure to leverage, at least not for Wireless PAN.

hottechgirl
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re: Goodbye, UWB; but we hardly knew you
hottechgirl   5/19/2009 4:52:00 PM
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OK, so this article hit the nail on the head, but is completely missing one important point - Wireless USB is based on UWB! Wireless USB is a simple extension to USB technology. The protocol and topology is completely re-used, so the billions of dollars of infrastructure investment is preserved. Wi-Fi and 60GHz do not have any of this infrastructure to leverage, at least not for Wireless PAN.



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As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

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