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jzee
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re: Analysis: Reality check for Motorola
jzee   11/5/2009 4:22:39 PM
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Motorola used to be an innovative company until the infamous Padmasree Warrior and her army of grasshoppers, the likes of Anson Chen, Sam Desai, just to name a few, took over the company. These insects slowly chewed off the best parts of Motorola around the world in the name of cost cutting & went on to claim huge bonuses from short-term savings made. When Motorola finally started to sink, some of the insects simply vanished. Well done Mr. Jha, you now have the oppotunity to finish Motorola off! And a warning to were ever the insects have landed, your time will come soon.

Feenix
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re: Analysis: Reality check for Motorola
Feenix   11/4/2009 6:06:46 AM
NO RATINGS
Motorola has never gotten past it's "warring tribes" culture. Today, they have a history that includes several generations of managment that has never been successful in the market place. It is difficult to to overcome that history. The best thing about Motorola is that they served as a training ground for a lot of engineering talent.

turbovectorz
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Rookie
re: Analysis: Reality check for Motorola
turbovectorz   11/3/2009 9:27:13 PM
NO RATINGS
I think Moto is taking a major gamble with competing open-source smartphone HW/SW projects. They should stick to making good two-way radios.

DrDon
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Rookie
re: Analysis: Reality check for Motorola
DrDon   11/3/2009 9:09:13 PM
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"Cutting 9700 jobs has put Motorola in a competitive position", Hmmm... I do not agree with this comment. I did agree with the author that Motorola is not Apple, and Jha isn't Steve Jobs. Apple hasn't laid off their people and will still continue to dominate. "You cannot save your way to prosperity", Gordon Moore of Intel.

Guru of Grounding
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Rookie
re: Analysis: Reality check for Motorola
Guru of Grounding   11/3/2009 7:55:54 PM
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Why is no one willing to admit that there's a huge 60-something segment of the market that's not being served? I don't want a simple cell phone just because it's cheap, I want something to fill the gap between the "Jitterbug" and the feature-glutted, tiny-keyed, tiny screened, do everything gadgets that delight 20-somethings. I hate the inference that simple phones are only for the poor. Some of us have lots of money, but because we're not gadget geeks, and we have a real life instead of social networks, we're overlooked consistently! How about serving that market as a way to differentiate your self from all the other "also rans". It was a sad day indeed when Motorola started chasing trends and left a core business that they were very good at (semiconductors, that is).



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