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prabhakar_deosthali
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CEO
re: Nanotech coverts sewage into electricity
prabhakar_deosthali   8/2/2010 7:33:33 AM
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I also had another thought. In countries like Africa where Sunlight is available in abundance efforts have been made to make solar based distillation process to convert dirty pond water into drinking water. That sounds to me to be a much cheaper option and such systems are affordable too. This technology is available today!

prabhakar_deosthali
User Rank
CEO
re: Nanotech coverts sewage into electricity
prabhakar_deosthali   8/2/2010 7:28:52 AM
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Such a technology will be a real boon for countries like India where so much water goes down the drain during the season of Abundance ( monsoon season) and then in summer people have to walk miles to fetch a bucket of water to drink. This technology will enable people to harvest their own sewage to convert it back to potable water

ssirajd
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re: Nanotech coverts sewage into electricity
ssirajd   7/26/2010 7:57:51 AM
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Agree with Colin,The distance covered is great and in this case who will not like the idea of being able to use the wasted water and use the converted bi product specially when it is a commodity as useful as electricity.Feels like a dream coming true but tell you we are still miles away from the Reality of making use of the same in commercially viable options.

vin1980
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Rookie
re: Nanotech coverts sewage into electricity
vin1980   7/23/2010 8:33:13 AM
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nice work dudes

ewoelk
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Rookie
re: Nanotech coverts sewage into electricity
ewoelk   7/22/2010 8:58:41 PM
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I agree with Colin. Something to watch. In general, the integration of biotechnlogy, materials technology and electronics is bound to wield many exciting new applications. And the field is still wide open. The future of our kids may depend on it.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Blogger
re: Nanotech coverts sewage into electricity
R_Colin_Johnson   7/22/2010 4:31:08 PM
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Generating enough electricity from sewage to run a water treatment plant sounds like a serpent eating its own tail, but these OSU researchers may be onto something. There are many other efforts underway to create bacteria-powered fuel cells, but more conventional approaches have always won out in specific applications areas--usually because keeping bacteria strains alive is a job for pros not consumers who just want the energy generated. However, sewage treatment plants have a vested interest in keeping those bacteria happily generating electricity. And if such plants can generate enough electricity to become self-sustaining, then it might be possible to solve at least some of the world's clean water woes too! This is definitely a technology to watch (and keep our fingers crossed that is becomes commercially viable).



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