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LarryM99
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
LarryM99   8/23/2010 8:31:23 PM
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I'm not used to being in the majority, but it looks like a lot of people here agree with me. If you track what is going on in the gaming PC space you see that the case manufacturers are starting to add slots for 2.5" devices. Their customers are demanding SSD's because they have figured out that they provide a major performance boost for disk I/O, especially on boot times. Does that translate to use by sane people? :-) At current prices, maybe not. But I have been running one in my main machine for a few months now. I am getting used to clicking on Outlook and having it come up practically instantly. I am spec'ing out a new HTPC right now and planning on an SSD boot drive (quiet, fast, and low power). I will be complementing it with a 2TB hard drive, though. I may be crazy but I'm not stupid. The error is in thinking of it as 'either-or'. SSD's will replace mechanicals in some applications, but will generally complement them. The real gains will show up when they stop pretending to be traditional hard drives, though, and are directly supported by the OS. Larry M.

przemek0
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
przemek0   8/23/2010 8:20:01 PM
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Besides high performance, another big advantage of SSDs in a high-end datacenter environment is their well-characterized life cycle. Rotating media hard drives fail randomly, whereas SSDs have a predictable endurance profile The firmware can estimate how much of the write endurance budget remains. This enables reliable predictive maintenance schedule and cuts down weekend overtime for the harrowed system administrators.

JamesAndersonMerritt
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
JamesAndersonMerritt   8/23/2010 8:02:32 PM
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Price is a big issue, in terms of whether or not there is a consumer business or market there. For myself, if I could get a 200GB SSD for $300-400, I'd buy it immediately, as replacement of the cranky HD now in my laptop. But such drives now retail for hundreds of dollars more. I'm biding my time, and I bet that many others are, too.

dirk.bruere
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
dirk.bruere   8/23/2010 7:52:07 PM
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SSDs will come to share desktop PCs with HDDs. My next PC will include a 128G SSD for OS and key apps, and a few TB of storage for media etc. However, the place where SSDs will make a big impact is laptops. My next laptop will be SSD only - I don't need TB of data on it. Also, my company is getting rid of the HDD from its media products and replacing it with SSD and HDD NASboxes

mark.lapedus
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
mark.lapedus   8/23/2010 4:48:42 PM
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Right. Agree. But are the Fortune 500s buying SSDs in their datacenters? Can they trust them? If I ran a poll today, I'll bet they would say no.

resistion
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
resistion   8/23/2010 9:46:11 AM
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Enterprise storage may be the next meaningful battlefield for HDD vs SSD. But it doesn't look like HDD will lose, more of a matter of how much SSD can win.

andyzg
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
andyzg   8/23/2010 8:41:24 AM
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Yes. SSDs will be integrated maybe onto a single SOIC with PCIE/AHCI or SATA. not necessarily large, it is enough to hold C: drive contents (windows and apps). if the user needs bulk storage, they may have a NAS or a mechanical HDD can be added as drive D:

mark.lapedus
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
mark.lapedus   8/23/2010 7:52:54 AM
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I agree too. However, Gartner thinks that 90 percent of all SSD makers will fail. That makes sense. There are too many SSD makers out there. The big guys (Intel, Samsung, etc.) will survive. These guys have fabs and controller technology. Some say the guys with no fabs or controller technology will die. Agree or not?

phoenixdave
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
phoenixdave   8/23/2010 12:38:22 AM
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@Rick - I totally agree that both are likely to be around for a long time. They both have advantages for their applications. There's room for both in this fast-changing technology world.

rick merritt
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re: SSDs: Still not a 'solid state' business
rick merritt   8/22/2010 10:58:38 PM
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Neither HDDs or SSDs are likely to die or become niche in the next ten years. In fact, both are likely to continue to expand as digital technology expands with new products and markets and both technologies improve. I wrote a couple stories this week about the long term road map for HDDs. See http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-news/4206326/Decision-time-looms-for-hard-drive-makers The upshot is drives have a major tech transition ahead in about 2015 and much is still uncertain. Still HDD makers have been through this sort or re-invention before, there are plenty of ideas on the table and drives are likely to continue costing a few pennies per Gbyte into the foreseeable future.

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