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old account Frank Eory
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re: Wireless audio distribution - the last 30 meters
old account Frank Eory   10/13/2010 5:37:31 PM
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As the author points out, it's much easier to find 3 MHz of available spectrum in an ISM band than it is to find 20+ MHz. Yet even with the 20+ MHz needed for 802.11g or the 40 MHz needed for 802.11n, hundreds of millions of WiFi users are able to make their WiFi devices work, despite sharing the same spectrum -- with other WiFi users as well as with Bluetooth, Zigbee, cordless phones, baby monitors, etc. The argument that tomorrow may bring a wireless application that is more beneficial is, in my opinion, a good argument for allocating even more spectrum for unlicensed ISM use -- not an argument for limiting ISM use to only those standards that are already established (WiFi, Bluetooth, etc.). As for copy protection concerns, that is a good subject for an entirely different discussion about analog vs. unencrypted digital vs. encrypted digital content and the DMCA law...and why copying for personal use is permitted for the first two types of content, but not for the third (encrypted).

WKetel
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re: Wireless audio distribution - the last 30 meters
WKetel   10/6/2010 10:34:39 PM
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The reason for not using up all of the spectrum today is that tomorrow something much more useful may arrive that would benefit us a lot more than not having to run speaker wires. That is one reason. Next, consider that these wireless systems offer no protection from interference by other systems using the same frequencies. Beyond that, there is an interesting realm of copying concern, if we have a digital transmission of some copy protected program, and the transmitted version is not copy protected, we have just defeated the "copy police". I admit that is a stretch, but it could get some folks excited. To repeat myself, when the spectrum is all used up, it is gone, and they aren't making spectrum any more.

t.alex
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re: Wireless audio distribution - the last 30 meters
t.alex   10/2/2010 12:24:04 AM
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Wketel, if the spectrum is available, why not use it?

WKetel
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re: Wireless audio distribution - the last 30 meters
WKetel   9/29/2010 7:15:40 PM
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While there might actually be some value in wireless audio, using it just to avoid running wires is a terrible waste of spectrum. Remember that there is only so much spectrum, and when it is full there is no more room, and something loses. So yes, it is neat to be able to do this, but it does constitute a waste of spectrum.

t.alex
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re: Wireless audio distribution - the last 30 meters
t.alex   9/26/2010 12:12:07 AM
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Besides the issues covered by the article, I think the number of audio streams supported is important as well. In home theatre system, the left and the right speak play different contents.

old account Frank Eory
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re: Wireless audio distribution - the last 30 meters
old account Frank Eory   9/23/2010 8:07:48 PM
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Great article, nicely covering the major issues of wireless digital audio distribution. I'm looking forward to trying out an SMSC-powered set of wireless speakers.



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As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

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