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Adrianus
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re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
Adrianus   11/2/2010 12:19:01 AM
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The solution to a materials supply problem is not more government. Just leave industry alone and free to do what they do best. Businessmen operating in a laissez faire economy will solve the problem much more efficient than an army of Czars in Washington possibly could. Just get rid of the Looters and let Hank Rearden do his thing.

jaybus0
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CEO
re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
jaybus0   10/13/2010 12:02:02 PM
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Exports to China of soy beans, rice, and other agricultural products related to the food industry have steadily increased over recent years. While there are no export taxes in the US, there are export controls. The US could, like China, place quotas on exports of food industry products, thereby fighting fire with fire by driving up the cost of food for Chinese consumers. That is a pretty good bargaining chip, since demand for food is not likely to decline in China.

terry1
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re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
terry1   10/6/2010 2:38:17 PM
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First China prodused a lot of rare earths . dropped the price made it unprofitable. now they stopped exports.

terry1
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re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
terry1   10/6/2010 2:33:23 PM
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So whadda bout Great Western Minerals? A Canadian company with a refinery in Michigan

kdboyce
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re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
kdboyce   10/4/2010 4:24:54 AM
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This is a lesson, among many others that currently exist, that no nation should cede its manufacturing power to another. Too many times USA companies and the government have let industries and key technologies slip away due to not supporting proper national imperatives as well as financial short sightedness.

KB3001
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CEO
re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
KB3001   10/3/2010 7:32:45 PM
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"It should only be fair that U.S. companies have mining rights to the Afghanistan deposits." Why? :-) To follow on this article, China is also investing heavily in Africa and in South America to access natural resources such as rare earth materials among other resources. A monopoly or near monopoly on these resources is not in the interest of anybody really. I do not think the Chinese officials are stupid to use these materials as economic weapons. I believe they are simply trying to secure their own supplies, like any other major power including the US.

davewav
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re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
davewav   10/3/2010 6:02:04 AM
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Rare earth metals are needed for electic motors - inculding hybrid electic vehicles, commercial wind turbines and high speed train engines. With China trying to corner the market on rare earth elements they are trying to become major players in manufacturing of the above technology markets. A recent PBS news segment stated there was only one U.S. rare earth metal mining operation but it needed help to get production up. A recent USGS report found deposits of minerals including rare earth in Afganistan may be worth $1 trillion. It should only be fair that U.S. companies have mining rights to the Afghanistan deposits.

nicolas.mokhoff
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re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
nicolas.mokhoff   10/1/2010 8:02:56 PM
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Our infatuation with low-cost labor allowed China to call the shots in rare earth metals used by the electronics industry. Both Japan and the U.S., as the world's most advanced economies, cannot afford to be cut off. So yes, while Japan is trying to find alternate solutions to using rare earth elements in their motors, the U.S. cannot afford to wait for this kind of development to see fruition. It needs to start opening the mines it closed earlier to catch up.

Robotics Developer
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Rookie
re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
Robotics Developer   10/1/2010 6:28:46 PM
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I just read an article here that talks about the the development of a non-rare earth magnet electric motor (http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-news/4209004/Japan-researchers-develop-electric-motor-sans-rare-earth-metals). Perhaps the rest of the world should follow suit? It seems that we are being surprised by this development, but should we have been surprised? It makes both great business and political sense to control these high tech metals, why wouldn't we in the US (or any other country) not already be engaged in securing supplies? It makes me wonder....

nicolas.mokhoff
User Rank
Rookie
re: U.S. must fast-track policy on rare earth materials
nicolas.mokhoff   10/1/2010 2:59:52 PM
NO RATINGS
I'd be curious to hear from electronics industry executives how not having a clear path to access rare earth elements might affect their business.

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