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kkersey
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
kkersey   1/7/2011 10:12:13 PM
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I think jbirch's comments on display headsets for 3D are thought provoking...worthy of attention. However, I think most people will want to use their big-screen TV's in conventional 2D mode most of the time, and only view 3D in movies or special sports broadcasts. I just returned from CES, and saw several glasses-free 3D displays (Sony, etc.). They were not very impressive as the viewer needs to be the right distance and within a fairly narrow angular alignment. LG's passive polarizing glasses were so lightweight and inexpensive - they are almost "throw away", yet the depth of their 3D was great at all viewing positions, and there were no "shimmering" artifacts like the active-shutter 3D glasses technology I saw. So...what I'm saying is that I don't think people will accept big compromises in 2D displays (screen size, resolution, cost) just to occasionally watch 3D content. Therefore, it seems that the relatively simple, low cost, and forgiving yet effective polarized passive-glasses technology of LG seems the best path forward.

jeremybirch
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
jeremybirch   10/12/2010 3:34:08 PM
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If you are going to wear glasses you might as well have the display in the glasses. That way you don't need to make your whole house slave to a huge screen, and the costs of manufacture of a high resolution screen 2 inches across is a lot lower than one 40 inches across. One screen per eye and you have 3d with no angle limitations. Not that this is great for family interaction, but neither are in-ear headphones. You could of course make the glasses go transparent when you looked away from the notional "screen" area of your lounge, that way you could look at you family without taking off the glasses. There is a lot more innovation to be had in making a good, lightweight headset than there is in brute force manufacture of huge screens. The Toshiba TV uses lenticular lenses (like on the cheap 3d / moving printed images we all knew as kids) so there are N pixels behind each lens and if the viewer sits at the right position he gets a different image to the left and right eyes. But if he sits in the wrong place then the images get mixed. This of course requires the real screen has N times the horizontal resolution - hence the price I suspect. All of the designs that require a single large screen, whether with glasses or lenticulars, suffer from the user having to have their head vertical in order to see things correctly - not so good for relaxing on the couch! If you use a 3d headset then it does not matter which way up your head is!

jimcondon
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
jimcondon   10/12/2010 2:51:03 AM
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Has anyone else heard that standard 2D images are distorted using the lens used by the Toshiba TVs? If so, this would be a major issue for the glasses free TV. I'm trying to find confirmation on this.

Charles.Desassure
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
Charles.Desassure   10/10/2010 12:16:03 AM
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Interesting article. If Toshiba can come up with a TV that will not require wearing glasses, I believe that this will be a big hit for the holiday season. Wearing glasses to watch TV? Most families are too busy these days for that. Without the glasses is the way to go

goafrit
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
goafrit   10/6/2010 10:55:18 PM
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This is innovation and could be very disruptive. I cannot wait for it to come. I have the goggle thing, now, we can watch TV without appearing like comedians in our homes. This is innovation.

Baolt
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
Baolt   10/6/2010 10:29:56 PM
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Whenever first HD sets were revealed there were quite aggressive arguments about its future and worth. Now almost all sets produced now are HD compatible. However the most important things which made HD reality were low cost HD video recording systems & digital broadcasting. 3D TV sets are highly pumped in the market besides i dont think its worth to pay lots of money in order to see some films which have some 3D effects. With our without glass that doesnt matter. Still its dam' costy to make 3D effects, or shuting videos. Not so many people are also well educated about how to shut it. 3D TV sets would be marvelous whenever 3D compatible game consoles hit the market. That time it would be really worth to pay huge amounts of $s. Notebooks with 3D displays, hmm to do what, work on 3D excel tables? Again same logic would hit, gaming experience in 3D notebooks. For mobile sets, there is an research ongoing financed by EU however i dont know if anybody seriously would like to do mass production. Enjoying 3D with limited size not so relevant indeed. However implementing it to portable pads would be great in my view. Why to focus so much on 3D which would barely make money, and why not concentrating on flexible ultra thin, low power consuming display technologies?

IqbalSingh.Josan
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
IqbalSingh.Josan   10/6/2010 12:47:15 PM
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Perhaps the best starter application for this glasses free 3D TV will be in the video gaming industry. Next would be in 3D medical imaging, such as a 3D sonogram that could be seen without glasses. I do not think it will add much value to main stream entertainment, for which 3D viewing with glasses will continue to provide much better user experience. Visit us at uspurtek.com

rick merritt
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
rick merritt   10/6/2010 4:43:46 AM
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Remember, Toshiba is a big notebook maker too, so this is great for their notebooks, but marginal for their TVs

Neo10
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
Neo10   10/6/2010 2:59:53 AM
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Well, it's just that Toshiba wanted to go public with what they have at their lab. Others being mum doesn't mean they don't have something similar. Its promising, but quite a lot of work to do from improving the viewing experience to controlling the cost and the market is still warming up to the LCD technology itself.

pixies
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re: Toshiba’s glasses-free 3-D panel: Worth the wait?
pixies   10/6/2010 2:29:15 AM
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Does anybody know how exactly the glass-less 3-D work?

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