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R_Colin_Johnson
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
R_Colin_Johnson   11/16/2010 2:48:51 AM
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Thank you for your constructive criticism. Having spent some time with Kentridge recently, I am surprised to find he has critics. Personally, he exudes competence, empathy, even wisdom. He never claimed to me to have invented stop-motion animations or anything else, but merely to have expressed his artistry with them. However, since my judgement was influenced by my personal experience of him, I defer to your superior ethical judgement.

javari
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
javari   11/14/2010 12:02:45 PM
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You really have no clue here about the aesthetic or critical theory issues, let alone the reality of South African politics. Corny humanism and ignorance of the history of film are no substitute for ethical judgement. This clearly is not your field of expertise.

yalanand
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
yalanand   11/14/2010 8:36:32 AM
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Heartly congratulations to Mr. Lovasz. And we all wish him best of luck for his future for his research on very large networks at Princeton.

wave.forest
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
wave.forest   11/13/2010 2:12:12 PM
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The LLL is one of the most imprtant three algorithms of last century. Th eother two are FFT and ellipsoid algorithm. The LLL has many aplpications. In addition to irs application in wireless and network, it broke and buried Knapsack public key.

Luis Sanchez
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
Luis Sanchez   11/12/2010 9:49:58 PM
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I had the fortune of being at a presentation of the Kyoto prize Laureate. It was really interesting to here the words from man that have excell in their activities. The work of these inspire and invite one to excell too and achieve. The words from Mr. Obama are simple but quite true. It is a great thing to be able to contribute to the benefit of man-kind by the improvement of things and the discovery of new solutions to old problems. That is creation of wealth. Cell phone use is becoming more and more widespread. Will the day come when the network carriers aren't able to provide a good service anymore? Will they say someday, "sorry we don't have capacity left, please wait in the line?" The work from Mr. Lovasz is needed exactly for being able to answer such kind of questions. Congrats to Mr. Lovasz... now... what is graph theory? :-)

R_Colin_Johnson
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
R_Colin_Johnson   11/12/2010 8:55:11 PM
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Indeed, Kentridge is remarkably innovative, pioneering the most artistic application of stop motion animations of which I am aware. Because he takes an original image and alters it, turning frame 1 into frame 2 by erasing and redrawing a small part, by the end of the process only his film has a complete record of his art. Also if you pay attention to the themes he portrays, a understanding of his deep empathy for the human condition emerges, putting him on par with other great commentators on South Africa.

javari
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
javari   11/12/2010 5:35:58 PM
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ADDENDUM Kentridge misappropriates Melies's term and original 'accidental' invention at the origin of "montage" . . . . DMK Cybereditor

javari
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
javari   11/12/2010 4:52:12 PM
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Disney invented stop motion drawing which became the animation industry. Kentridge used to call his technique "stone age filmmaking." He did not invent stop motion drawing--he simply substitute charcoal for easier erasure with a trace than the usual pencil before digitization. For more on the last decade of Kentridge's work, see books by Jennifer Arlene Stone (paperbacks on Amazon) on THE APP on javari http://javari.com New York NY DMK Cybereditor

jthscovie
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re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
jthscovie   11/12/2010 11:15:12 AM
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Among many, many achievements, Lovasz solved an open problem on Shannon capacity in the field of information theory, which advanced the development of wireless networks. Interestingly, a 1989 Kyoto Prize laureate, Dr. Amos Edward Joel, made an earlier contribution to wireless. Joel may be best known for U.S. Patent No. 3,663,762, filed in 1972, that outlines an early method for a wireless device user to maintain an uninterrupted connection while moving from one "cell" to another (i.e., "cellular" phone). Kudos to Johnson and EETimes for calling attention to giants like Shannon, Joel and Lovasz, who have truly changed our world, while other news sites seem fixated on Miley Cyrus.

R_Colin_Johnson
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Blogger
re: Algorithm pioneer wins Kyoto Prize
R_Colin_Johnson   11/12/2010 9:47:38 AM
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Dr. Lovasz is a naturalized U.S. citizen, turning in his green card for full citizenship during his tenure at Microsoft (1999 to 2006). He is living in Hungary now, but he told me today that next year he will return to the U.S. to research very large networks at Princeton University. My experience in Japan this week confirms that he is highly respected here--his work cited as enabling both mobile phone and wireless sensor networks to be more easily analyzed and designed. In particular, his mathematical techniques allow bounds to be determined for both maximum capacity of large networks (even when the nodes are moving, such as when mobile-phone users roam) as well as the minimum necessary spacing of nodes, such as cell phone towers. For the future, he plans to further elucidate very large networks by specifying exactly how to accurately simulate them with smaller-sized versions that can easily be modeled on PCs, rather than requiring supercomputer-caliber models as is the case today. The 62 year old Kyoto Prize laureate told me today that he plans to actively pursue his research interest for at least another decade before retiring--so stay tuned!



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