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old account Frank Eory
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re: The case for stand-alone reset timers in mobile devices
old account Frank Eory   12/22/2010 8:08:18 PM
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Doesn't every PMIC include a robust, software-proof watchdog timer reset function? Do some mobile handset designers really allocate PCB space for a separate watchdog IC? Why?

Forma
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re: The case for stand-alone reset timers in mobile devices
Forma   12/22/2010 5:04:36 PM
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The concept isn't new - there are already reset/watchdog ic chips often used in such designs. They allow communication with the Application processor to set-up a timer, whilst also providing protection for the SoC by holding the reset until the power is stable. It's know for years so above sounds more like a reminder than 'innovation'..

Andrewier
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re: The case for stand-alone reset timers in mobile devices
Andrewier   12/21/2010 12:57:20 AM
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Ahnnnn... A real (I mean not software) switch, anyone? After some really strong design and debuging, of course.

Code Monkey
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re: The case for stand-alone reset timers in mobile devices
Code Monkey   12/20/2010 4:28:57 PM
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The last handheld device I worked on had an FPGA. Software was expected to detect the "power" button after 3 seconds to provide the usual graceful shutdown, but for safety we put in logic to shut off power if the user holds down the button for more than 5 seconds. It's hard to imagine phone designers leaving out such a failsafe feature. Especially since Microsoft has conditioned users to expect a "reset button".

sharps_eng
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re: The case for stand-alone reset timers in mobile devices
sharps_eng   12/11/2010 11:17:06 PM
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I always scroll to the last page to check the writer's byline: ahah, its a Fairchild guy selling chips. Fair enough, but some of his fixit examples are just fixing terribly bad design in the original smartphones, ie the white screen of death; having to remove the battery... seems they never learn. I hereby declare that my preference is for a separate watchdog device, but I'd use an on-chip device provided it was independent of everything except the power rails. (I am assuming we are not talking about hi-rel devices here by the way.)



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