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old account Frank Eory
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
old account Frank Eory   12/22/2010 11:01:50 PM
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Perhaps Windows for Tablets should evolve from Windows Phone rather than from Windows 7. It should, of course, run on ARMs as well as Atoms. One must wonder though if MS isn't too late to the tablet party to make a difference.

Dave.Dykstra
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Dave.Dykstra   12/23/2010 3:32:34 AM
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Since companies have been looking at ARMs for several years (and developing a number of products, not just tablets, on that platform), one wonders where Windows has been and if they can catch up.

LarryM99
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
LarryM99   12/23/2010 5:46:28 PM
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What CPU they are running on is the least of Microsoft's concerns in terms of tablets. Their knee-jerk reaction is to impose the Windows heavy client model on them, which is far from optimum. This was their mistake in the first round of tablets a decade ago. Making it into a big phone isn't quite right either, as is being discovered with the current generation of tablets. CES this year will be the first chance to see Google's take on a real tablet operating system and user model. There is a door still open here for Microsoft, but it may be closing fast. Larry M.

Duane Benson
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Duane Benson   12/23/2010 6:32:25 PM
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I disagree with the premise that Microsoft Office is not a requirement for broad adoption of a Windows tablet OS. Regardless of any amount or lack of suitability, Windows is used by the masses and the masses need transparent interoperability. People have enough trouble just managing file location and duplication with multiple devices. Add in format differences between a tablet and a full-PC and the problem will on be much worse. If tablets become inexpensive enough to be single use devices (web browsing only, entertainment only, etc) then, perhaps it would work without office application compatibility, but as anything close to a replacement for a netbook/notebook or as any kind of a productivity tool, it just won't fly without it.

goafrit
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
goafrit   12/23/2010 9:09:09 PM
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It is not the technology it is the cost. Android is free and you cannot sell Windows and hardware and expect profit. Window tablets are expensive because of the OS fees. That is the problem

Baolt
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Baolt   12/23/2010 11:49:20 PM
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I agree that MS is hungry-bat for license fee, on the other hand dont agree that Free software is the key. What about Apple than? they dont ask for license cost however they dont allow you to play with other rules. The way that MS could win from the pad market is that they make serious partnership with computer producers as like Dell, Asus, Acer etc with low cost license and ARM support. On the other hand we are talking about WIntel cooperation. I dont think in short term we could see ARM based MS systems

dirk.bruere
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
dirk.bruere   12/23/2010 9:49:43 PM
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I don't see tablets being "productivity tools", but a new class of machines. My company, for example, will be using tablets as super remote controls to be supplied with our AV systems. I think they will mainly be entertainment devices.

LarryM99
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
LarryM99   12/23/2010 10:07:34 PM
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Extend your definition of remote controls into industrial control panels and other similar applications and I would tend to agree with you. Larry M.

dirk.bruere
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
dirk.bruere   12/23/2010 10:59:03 PM
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Good point Larry. In fact, maybe industrial control panels will disappear into tablets. Just boxes and tablets...

rick merritt
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
rick merritt   12/24/2010 12:24:08 AM
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@Duane: Good point. Maybe MS could create a streamlined version of Windows and Office for the tablet, one that ran fast and wasn't such a memory and power hog, ditching many features

przem
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
przem   12/24/2010 4:30:14 AM
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"Maybe MS could create a streamlined version of Windows and Office for the tablet, one that ran fast and wasn't such a memory and power hog, ditching many features" You just described Open Office... Here lies Microsoft's problem, actually: they put together a well-integrated platform (Windows + Explorer + Office), made sure that it's not modular, for technological and legal reasons (remember how they argued during the anti-trust trial that IE cannot be separated from Windows?), and now it bites them on the mobile platforms.

jimcondon
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
jimcondon   12/27/2010 2:13:56 AM
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I agree with Rick's opinion that Windows needs to support ARM in the server side. The Windows licensing fees are not going to fly vs. Android, and they won't take any seats away from iOS :). Why not defend the home turf where people are still paying for an OS and you are still a market leader not a 2nd tier me too OS.

elctrnx_lyf
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
elctrnx_lyf   12/27/2010 2:10:59 PM
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Windows can go into many devices if Microsoft comes out into market with a new version of operating system for different class of devices such tablet and PC. But I feel they are slow and non-innovative. Never the less I think it is time for Microsoft to show some new colours just like what google did with chrome and android.

agk
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
agk   12/27/2010 2:51:07 PM
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Microsoft may be slow in bringing out new packs but their software packages are very efficient ,user friendly,reliable and they have a good on line support.So MS will have a broad range of users for ever.

jimcondon
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
jimcondon   12/28/2010 2:46:47 AM
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Agk, You can probably argue this on the desktop, but I'm found WinCE no better than using an embedded linux. The online support for embedded linux is just as good as WinCE and I've found porting linux easier. So in the embedded world, which is closer to the tablet world than the PC work, Windows has no advantage. Jim

wilber_xbox
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
wilber_xbox   12/27/2010 10:01:44 PM
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It will not be long for people to realize that there are better (and free) OS than Windows OS. It will happen with the end of era of PCs. Google is already tapping market for mobile OS and web-based OS, which might change the way we will work on mobile platform.

Robotics Developer
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Robotics Developer   12/28/2010 3:00:37 AM
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Given that cost is a major factor in most consumer purchases and ignoring the dedicated high-tech savvy minority (the early adopters, no price too high tech types) the way for MS to make inroads is to provide low cost ARM based Windows products. I would suggest a streamlined, no-frills OS with basic word and internet capacity. Considering how many devices are going to be in the medical category, MS would do well to target ARM based medical devices. With the medical market, cost is not the main factor; the main concerns are reliability, robustness, and intuitive user interface. MS could do well to be in that market.

LarryM99
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
LarryM99   12/28/2010 3:49:20 AM
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Medical has the same barriers that defense and industrial have - All of these demand certification of reliability. In the past this has not been a Windows strong suit. Maybe it is more achievable now, given the emphasis they have made on security and reliability over the last couple of years, but it is yet to be proven. Larry M.

Duane Benson
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Duane Benson   12/29/2010 5:07:03 PM
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Where do you find MS's greatest successes? MSDOS was built on top of QDOS, purchased from another company. Windows followed the MAC and Lisa OS (And the Xerox Star). IE really followed Netscape browser. The X-Box followed generations of game consoles. I'm not making a statement about "good vs. bad" relative to this approach, just that following and improving is what they have done best. That's where MS has succeeded to the greatest degree in the past. The have the money, person-power and marketing muscle to look very closely at what others are doing, see what customers do with it and then build a product that will work well for the masses. They haven't always been successful at this approach (phones, music players), but if they keep at it, they will build a broadly used product. Given that, I can see them dabbling in ARM product OSs for a while and then diving in full force once the market settles into real-world use for the products. The past few years as well as what happens with ARM OSs in the next few years is really not relevant to MSs ultimate success in that market.



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