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Baolt
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Baolt   12/23/2010 11:49:20 PM
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I agree that MS is hungry-bat for license fee, on the other hand dont agree that Free software is the key. What about Apple than? they dont ask for license cost however they dont allow you to play with other rules. The way that MS could win from the pad market is that they make serious partnership with computer producers as like Dell, Asus, Acer etc with low cost license and ARM support. On the other hand we are talking about WIntel cooperation. I dont think in short term we could see ARM based MS systems

dirk.bruere
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
dirk.bruere   12/23/2010 10:59:03 PM
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Good point Larry. In fact, maybe industrial control panels will disappear into tablets. Just boxes and tablets...

LarryM99
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
LarryM99   12/23/2010 10:07:34 PM
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Extend your definition of remote controls into industrial control panels and other similar applications and I would tend to agree with you. Larry M.

dirk.bruere
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
dirk.bruere   12/23/2010 9:49:43 PM
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I don't see tablets being "productivity tools", but a new class of machines. My company, for example, will be using tablets as super remote controls to be supplied with our AV systems. I think they will mainly be entertainment devices.

goafrit
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
goafrit   12/23/2010 9:09:09 PM
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It is not the technology it is the cost. Android is free and you cannot sell Windows and hardware and expect profit. Window tablets are expensive because of the OS fees. That is the problem

Duane Benson
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Duane Benson   12/23/2010 6:32:25 PM
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I disagree with the premise that Microsoft Office is not a requirement for broad adoption of a Windows tablet OS. Regardless of any amount or lack of suitability, Windows is used by the masses and the masses need transparent interoperability. People have enough trouble just managing file location and duplication with multiple devices. Add in format differences between a tablet and a full-PC and the problem will on be much worse. If tablets become inexpensive enough to be single use devices (web browsing only, entertainment only, etc) then, perhaps it would work without office application compatibility, but as anything close to a replacement for a netbook/notebook or as any kind of a productivity tool, it just won't fly without it.

LarryM99
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
LarryM99   12/23/2010 5:46:28 PM
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What CPU they are running on is the least of Microsoft's concerns in terms of tablets. Their knee-jerk reaction is to impose the Windows heavy client model on them, which is far from optimum. This was their mistake in the first round of tablets a decade ago. Making it into a big phone isn't quite right either, as is being discovered with the current generation of tablets. CES this year will be the first chance to see Google's take on a real tablet operating system and user model. There is a door still open here for Microsoft, but it may be closing fast. Larry M.

Dave.Dykstra
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
Dave.Dykstra   12/23/2010 3:32:34 AM
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Since companies have been looking at ARMs for several years (and developing a number of products, not just tablets, on that platform), one wonders where Windows has been and if they can catch up.

old account Frank Eory
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re: My Windows roadmap for tablets and more
old account Frank Eory   12/22/2010 11:01:50 PM
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Perhaps Windows for Tablets should evolve from Windows Phone rather than from Windows 7. It should, of course, run on ARMs as well as Atoms. One must wonder though if MS isn't too late to the tablet party to make a difference.

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